The 40 Best Things To Do in Seattle This Week: Nov 19-25, 2018

George Balanchine's The Nutcracker, a Best American Comics Birthday Bash, and More Arts Critics' Picks

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

The Pacific Northwest Ballet will bring back the wintery magic of George Balanchine's     The Nutcracker    , starting this weekend. ANGELA STERLING

The Pacific Northwest Ballet will bring back the wintery magic of George Balanchine's The Nutcracker, starting this weekend. ANGELA STERLING

Our music critics have already chosen the 23 best music shows this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn to recommend the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks in every genre—from the opening of Lin-Manuel Miranda's In the Heights to the holiday cocktail wonderland Miracle on 2nd, and from Thanksgiving dinners to the first weekend of the Enchant Christmas light spectacular. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

COMEDY

Losing It: Grief Comedy
The witty Claire Webber will host a night of sets on funny sad things by sad comedians, namely Rachel Larendau, Bobby Higley, Matt Valdispino, Sam Miller, Natalie Holt, Dewa Dorje, Lucy Tollefson, Bernice Je, and Heather Paul. This sounds like the perfect balm for a sore heart. It's presented by the Good Mourning festival. 

FILM

Michael Franti: 'Stay Human' Documentary Tour
Bay Area rapper/vocalist/guitarist will perform and present the new doc Stay Human, a hopeful look at people around the world battling pollution, illness, poverty, and war through innovation, love, and courage. The film also looks at Franti's personal and musical story. The evening will include a Q&A.

READINGS & TALKS

Damien Echols: High Magick
In a story made famous by the HBO trilogy Paradise Lost in 1994, then-18-year-old Damien Echols, along with other teens, was convicted of murdering three young boys as part of an alleged Satanic ritual in West Memphis, Arkansas. After 18 years in prison and a better-late-than-never examination of DNA evidence, Echols and the others were released, an experience he wrote about in the 2012 book Life After Death. His latest work, High Magick, is a guide to the spiritual practices that helped Echols survive nearly two decades locked up for crimes he didn’t commit. KATIE HERZOG

David Sedaris
Beloved humorist David Sedaris returns to Seattle for roughly his 10,000th appearance. This time around, he’ll be reading from his new book of essays, Calypso. As with all of his readings, you’ll find yourself wishing you’d been born a Sedaris, but this time around, don’t be surprised if you shed at least one tear—maybe two. Calypso, as usual, is laugh-out-loud funny, but it’s also a sweet, sad meditation on getting older, on death’s inevitable approach, on lives both gone right and gone wrong. KATIE HERZOG

Jonathan Franzen: The End of the End of the Earth
Megan Burbank, formerly editor of The Stranger's sister paper the Portland Mercury, once called Franzen "the Gwyneth Paltrow of the literary world." His latest book is a collection of essays and speeches mostly from the past five years. They touch on endangered seabirds, his relationship with his uncle, and other diverse topics.

Liane Moriarty: Nine Perfect Strangers
Nine urbanites arrive eager for relaxation at an isolated health retreat, Tranquillum House, but the transformation promised is not quite what they were expecting in this new novel by Australian author Liane Moriarty (Big Little Lies, now an HBO series). Hear her read tonight.

TUESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

David Shields: Nobody Hates Trump More Than Trump: An Intervention
The prolific author and UW Milliman Distinguished Writer-in-Residence David Shields offers a "satirical compilation of the 'collected wit and wisdom of Donald Trump,'" an investigation into his psychological state, and a dissection of the politesse that gave rise to and sustains Trump. He'll be joined in conversation by biographer and essayist Neal Thompson.

TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY

PERFORMANCE

Kitten N’ Lou Present: Cream
A confession: I've watched Kitten N' Lou's wedding video at least 20 times. They're just so gosh darn intoxicating and lovely. (It's on their website. I didn't, like, steal it or anything.) The burlesque duo exudes a chemistry unrivaled by any other stage pair I've seen, and, luckily for Seattle, this "world's showbusiest couple" are mainstays of the Emerald City. Their show Cream brings Vivacious, Cherdonna, and the Atomic Bombshells along for a Spanksgiving feast of drag and burlesque. Go and prepare to fall in love. CHASE BURNS

TUESDAY-SATURDAY

Note: Repeating events are likely not occurring on Thanksgiving; double-check before attending

ART

Martha Shade: Observations From the Lost and Found
Shade experiments with sculpture and beautiful, mosaic-like embroidery that reference ancient art and mythology. 
Closing Saturday

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

A People's History
Mike Daisey is back in town, as he often is, with a pretty simple but brilliant bit. He's going to read you some pages from Good Will Hunting's favorite history book—Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States. Then he's going to read you some pages from his high-school history book. Then we're all going to sit there and have a little reflection session on the difference between history as told by the conquerors and history as told from the perspective of the dispossessed. RICH SMITH

WEDNESDAY

COMEDY

Jamali Maddix
A comedian who’s half white (English) and half black (Jamaican), Jamali Maddix ranks as one of today’s most acute and funny young observers on racism. In his Viceland TV show Hate Thy Neighbor, Maddix boldly saunters into the rotten heart of extremist hate groups, examines their aggro actions, and tries to discern what motivates them. It’s a brilliant concept, and you’ll learn a lot while busting an occasional gut. In his stand-up act, Maddix further explores the many facets of racial issues, but he sometimes roams outside of them, as his “Karl Marx of pussy” bit will attest. DAVE SEGAL

Minority Retort presents: Yogi Paliwal
This Portland-bred comedy night showcasing comics of color is hosted by Jason Lamb, Julia Ramos, and Neeraj Srinivasan. They'll come to Seattle to host headliner Yogi Paliwal (who's from the Pacific Northwest and now lives in Brooklyn), Elliott GB, Alyssa Yeoman, and Silas Lindenstein.

FILM

Tod Browning's Freaks with DJ NicFit
You'll get a startling education from Tod Browning's 1932 circus horror Freaks  if you think that deeply, entertainingly fucked-up movies didn't exist before John Waters. A tawdry tale of carnival "freaks'" brutal vengeance against two able-bodied lovers who spurn their company, Freaks is not exactly a heartwarming or enlightening portrait of people with genetic anomalies and unusual physiognomies. However, the "freaks" are played by people with disabilities, and they're portrayed with humanity (and filmed with unsettling fascination). Given how few portrayals of folks with unusual bodies can be found in non-medical contexts in classic film, Freaks remains absolutely essential, even if the representation isn't everything it should be. DJ NicFit will provide a live-mixed soundtrack.

PERFORMANCE

The 2nd Annual Circus Tramp Holiday Show
Local music and burlesque queen Caela Bailey will helm this true family affair as her Von Tramp brood, one of the most active groups in the Seattle arts scene, will helm a night of glittering glamour, featuring plenty of high kicks, costume changes, and soulful cabaret tunes.

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

Note: Repeating events are likely not occurring on Thanksgiving; double-check before attending

ART

Daniel Ursache: Uncanny Figments
Daniel Ursache, a Romanian-born, Montreal-based artist who created the beautifully eerie poster art for the Romanian Film Festival Seattle, will show his stark, detailed, surreally charming pen and ink drawings all month. 
Closing Saturday

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

COMEDY

Seattle International Comedy Competition
For nearly all of November, a lengthy last-comic-standing battle rages. Thirty-two comedians (split into two batches, each of which performs every night for one week) start the contest, and one will finish a champion. Celebrity judges and audience reactions determine who passes the preliminaries and who becomes a finalist.

PERFORMANCE

Wonderland
Wonderland returns! Can Can will transform its venue into a snowy chalet and populate it with teasing beauties. If you just want to see pretty people dancing and eat short stacks or crab beignets with the fam, there's also a kid-friendly brunch version

THURSDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving: The pinnacle of American colonialism that commemorates a fake story of sharing. While the holiday is built on a lie, it's been adapted into a day to spend with loved ones, list gratitudes, and eat turkey and pie. Find a list of turkey trots and events on our Thanksgiving calendar, or check out our guide to where to eat Thanksgiving dinner.

FRIDAY

COMMUNITY

28th Annual Macy's Holiday Parade
In this festive procession of holiday cheer, bunches of floats, costumed characters, sports teams, and others march the Christmas-light-adorned streets of downtown for the Macy's Holiday Parade.

Macy's 62nd Annual Star Lighting and Fireworks Show
Per its annual tradition, Seattle's downtown Macy's will light up its 3,600-bulb star to greet the holiday season, and they'll celebrate with a grand fireworks display (weather permitting).

FOOD & DRINK

PNW Crab Feast
If the Pacific Northwest is known for one crustacean, it's the Dungeness Crab, whose meat is famously sweet and tender. This class—which includes lunch—will teach you how to choose your crab, how to break it down and clean it, and how to prepare a crab feast.

PERFORMANCE

A Necessary Sadness
Great local poets, storytellers, musicians, comedians, and others—Howie Echo-Hawk, Emmett Montgomery, Ravella Riffenburg, Jade Gee, et al—will join together for Danielle KL Gregoire's second production of A Necessary Sadness, which debuted at the Seattle Fringe Festival. The shows, part of Good Mourning: An Interactive Arts Festival About Grief, are inspired by John Koenig's Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, a compendium of invented words about complex emotions.

MUGZ
Americano will host this themeless drag night where styles can be diverse and out-there. For the first iteration, expect jaw-dropping insanity from "monthly mugz" Christian Brown, Michete, SHE, and Uh Oh (The Stranger's own Chase Burns), plus special guest Hera Diamandis. Recover from Turkey Day excesses with...more excess!

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

COMEDY

Uncle Mike Ruins Christmas
Mike Murphy (Uncle Mike, on Saturdays), Graham Downing (Cousin Graham, on Fridays), and Jet City cast members re-enact and trample over your fond Christmas memories in a happily vulgar performance. Not necessarily for squeamish types.

COMMUNITY

WildLights
The zoo will light up with more than 700,000 (energy-efficient) LED lights that recreate wild scenes and creatures at the annual WildLights display.

PERFORMANCE

Annie
This production of the classic musical is being directed by Billie Wildrick (she was the lead in the 5th Avenue’s recent Pajama Game), and she’s joined by an all-female creative team. Two young actors will switch off playing Annie. One of them is a girl of Tongan descent who happened to see 5th Avenue’s production of The Little Mermaid, in which Diana Huey played Ariel, and she turned to her mother and said, “Her skin is brown like me—that means I can do that, too.” Look at her now. Plus, Timothy McCuen Piggee will play Daddy Warbucks, and Cynthia Jones will play Miss Hannigan. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

COMMUNITY

Enchant Christmas
Not to knock quaint community Christmas tree displays, but this inaugural event at the Mariners' home base looks like it's going to raise the standards for holiday light spectacles by a lot. Safeco Field will be transformed into a magnificent winter wonderland complete with the "world's largest Christmas light maze" (which you can explore via an ice skating trail), seasonal concessions, live entertainment, and an artisan Christmas market.

PERFORMANCE

A Christmas Carol
ACT Theatre's production of A Christmas Carol is a dependable, simple pleasure, with just enough variation to warrant returning year after year. For the 43rd (!) edition, Kurt Beattie will direct and Ian Bell and David Pichette will alternate as Scrooge.

George Balanchine's 'The Nutcracker'
If you haven't seen this Christmas classic since you were a kid, give it a go this year. In 2014, PNB replaced its beloved Maurice Sendak set with one by Ian Falconer, who did the Olivia the Pig books, and I'm glad that they did. The new set is gorgeous in a Wes Anderson-y way, and it reflects the genuine weirdness and beauty in the story. I mean, the last 45 minutes of this thing is a Katy Perry video starring dancing desserts and a glittery peacock that moves like a sexy broken river. Bring a pot lozenge. RICH SMITH

In the Heights
Every decade, a musical comes around that reminds the general public that musicals can be popular, cool, and mainstream. The ’80s had A Chorus Line, the ’90s had Rent, the early ’00s had Wicked, and the teens had Hamilton. But before Lin-Manuel Miranda became a household name for creating Hamilton, he was snatching up trophies and accolades for his other hugely popular musical, In the Heights. Broadway fans will go and fall in love again, and newbies will get a chance to see Miranda's earlier work for the first time. CHASE BURNS

The Twilight Zone: Live!
In sixth grade, I was in a short school production of “To Serve Man” (“It’s a cookbook!”). I played one of the aliens. That particular Twilight Zone episode is also adapted for the stage in Theater Schmeater’s traditional holiday presentation, which also features adaptations of “The Shelter,” “Death’s Head Revisited,” and “The Changing of the Guard.” Rachel Delmar directs. LEILANI POLK

SATURDAY

ART

Best American Comics Birthday Bash!
Celebrate the Best American Comics Series's latest volume with eminent local contributors Max Clotfelder, Simon Hanselmann, Alex Graham, and D.J. Bryant. Also, it's Max's birthday! Have some cake. 

COMEDY

Amy Schumer
You doubtless know her from her film comedies, but stand-up is where she gets real. So real. Remember when she had her come-up in 2007 on Last Comic Standing? She didn’t win, even though her bubbly delivery made the obscene observations about being a woman (that I could totally relate to and that were probably NSF network television) even more hilarious. Her raunchy-ass humor has remained firmly intact as her star has risen, and this stop in Seattle on Thanksgiving weekend will find her preggos and incorporating that into her material, if her viral morning sickness Instagram pic (Schumer in front of the toilet: “Today Markle is in Fiji #same… Milf alert”) and reviews of recent sets are any indication. LEILANI POLK

23rd Annual Magic in the Market
Pike Place is already fairly magical around the holidays, but this annual event amps things up: Kids can meet Santa and decorate cookies, festive musical performances will take place, hot apple cider and hot cocoa will abound, and the holiday tree will light up for the season.

FILM

Hep Cats
Cats in movies have symbolized everything from elegance to curiosity to evil, but sometimes—like in Paul Schrader's bloody remake of the classic Cat People—a risky choice, and the last in the series.

FOOD & DRINK

Trove and YWE Bake Sale and Brunch Pop-Up
“Bake sale” may conjure connotations of PTA functions and requisite Betty Crocker standards like blondies and cupcakes, but this bake sale and brunch pop-up from Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi’s Trove promises to be far more exciting, with freshly baked goods like a raspberry-glazed eclair topped with Froot Loops (yes, please), coffee, tiki cocktails, and a hot brunch. Better yet, 100 percent of proceeds from the bake sale will go to Young Women Empowered, an organization that aims to empower young women with mentorship and programs. JULIANNE BELL

SUNDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Miracle on 2nd
In 2014, Greg Boehm of New York bar Boilermaker temporarily transformed the space for his bar Mace into a kitschy Christmas wonderland replete with gewgaws and tchotchkes galore. Now the pop-up has expanded to bars in 50 cities worldwide and will be taking up residence in Belltown’s Rob Roy. The specialty cocktails are no ordinary cups of cheer: Beverages are housed in tacky-tastic vessels (a drinking mug resembling Santa’s mug, for example), bedecked with fanciful garnishes like peppers and dried pineapple, and christened with irreverent, pop-culture-referencing names like the “Bad Santa,” the “Yippie Ki Yay Mother F**r,” and the “You’ll Shoot Your Rye Out.” JULIANNE BELL

PERFORMANCE

Campfire
Gutter Twink Productions presents a new night of performance of various types, including from the wondrously blunt rapper Michete and others to be announced. Bobby Higley, who is like a sad and magical ear of corn come beautifully to life, will host.

Fefu and Her Friends
One of the finest directors in town, Stranger Genius Award winner Valerie Curtis Newton, will direct a play by one of the best American playwrights, María Irene Fornés. Fefu and Her Friends is a play about a group of ladies preparing for a charitable event in Fefu's country house. The women reveal bold characters constrained by antiquated characterizations of feminine nature, and we catch glimpses of their love, loneliness, and internalized oppression.

READINGS & TALKS

Lose One Thing Every Day: Poetry by Wryly Tender McCutchen
This local poet, who's taught at Hugo House and performed at many venues, will tell stories and recite poetry about different types of loss. The organizers write: "No loss too large. No grief too small. All mourning admitted." This is part of the Good Mourning arts festival.

Kirkland Road Closures set for Half Marathon on Saturday

The event will benefit Cascade Challenge, a nonprofit dedicated to providing leadership and outdoor adventure opportunities to youth ages 14-20.

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With the Lake Washington Half Marathon set for Nov. 3, there will a number of road closures around town.

The race will start at 8 a.m. on the eastbound lanes of Juanita Drive Northeast and end at Juanita Beach Park.

The eastbound lane of Juanita Drive Northeast will be closed from 7-11:30 a.m. from 93rd Avenue Northeast to 98th Avenue Northeast.

From 7:30-10 a.m., Lakeshore Plaza will be closed. Merchants will have access to the Lakeshore Plaza parking lot via Kirkland Avenue.

The following timeline gives an approximate time frame for when runners will be at the listed intersections. The bulk of the runners will be onto the Cross Kirkland Corridor trail by 9:30 a.m.

  • 20th Avenue West and Market Street: 8:05-8:23 a.m.

  • Market Street and 6th Street West: 8:06-8:26 a.m.

  • Waverly Way and Market Street: 8:15-8:42 a.m.

  • Kirkland Avenue and Lake Street: 8:16-8:47 a.m.

  • Lake Washington Boulevard and Lakeview Drive: 8:23-9:08 a.m.

  • Lake Washington Boulevard and Northeast 38th Place: 8:28-9:21 a.m.

  • Northeast 38th Place and 108th Avenue Northeast: 8:31-9:26 a.m.

  • 108th Avenue Northeast and Cross Kirkland Corridor Trail: 8:32-9:29 a.m.

  • Cross Kirkland Corridor Trail and Northeast 112th Street: 8:54-10:41 a.m.

  • Northeast 112th Street and Forbes Creek Drive: 8:57-10:45 a.m.

  • Forbes Creek Drive and Market Street: 9:05-11:06 a.m.

The event — which will benefit Cascade Challenge, a nonprofit dedicated to providing leadership and outdoor adventure opportunities to youth ages 14-20 is expected to bring in about 1,000 people.

Ballot Drop Boxes!

Return your ballot to a ballot drop box, no stamp required. Your ballot must be returned to a ballot drop box by 8 p.m. election day. Plan ahead to avoid lines.

Auburn

Auburn Library 
1102 Auburn Way South 
Auburn, WA 98002 
Directions to Auburn Library 

Auburn Park & Ride 
101 15th Street NE 
Auburn, WA 98001 
Directions to Auburn Park & Ride 

Muckleshoot Tribe - Philip Starr Building 
39015 172nd Avenue SE 
Auburn, WA 98092 
Directions to Muckleshoot Tribe - Philip Starr Building 

Bellevue

Bellevue Regional Library 
1111 110th Avenue NE 
Bellevue, WA 98004 
Directions to Bellevue Regional Library 

Crossroads Shopping Center 
(south entrance) 
15600 NE 8th Street 
Bellevue, WA 98008 
Directions to Crossroads Shopping Center 

Newport Way Library 
14250 SE Newport Way 
Bellevue, WA 98006 
Directions to Newport Way Library 

Bothell

Bothell City Hall 
18415 101st Avenue NE 
Bothell, WA 98011 
Directions to Bothell City Hall 

Burien

Boulevard Park Library 
12015 Roseberg Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98168
Directions to Boulevard Park Library 

Burien Town Square Park 
(corner of 5th Avenue SW and SW 152nd Street) 
480 SW 152nd Street 
Burien, WA 98166 
Directions to Burien Town Square Park 

Covington

Covington Library 
27100 164th Avenue SE
Covington, WA 98042
Directions to Covington Library 

Des Moines

Highline College* 
(entrance across from 27th Ave S)
2400 S 240th Street
Des Moines, WA 98198
Directions to Highline College* 

Duvall

Duvall Police Department/Depot Park* 
26225 NE Burhen Way
Duvall, WA 98019
Directions to Duvall Police Department/Depot Park* 

Enumclaw

Enumclaw Library 
1700 1st Street
Enumclaw, WA 98022
Directions to Enumclaw Library 

Fall City

Fall City Library 
33415 SE 42nd Place
Fall City, WA 98024
Directions to Fall City Library 

Federal Way

Federal Way City Hall 
33325 8th Avenue South
Federal Way, WA 98003
Directions to Federal Way City Hall 

Issaquah

Issaquah City Hall 
130 E Sunset Way
Issaquah, WA 98027
Directions to Issaquah City Hall 

Kenmore

Kenmore City Hall 
18120 68th Avenue NE
Kenmore, WA 98028
Directions to Kenmore City Hall 

Kent

Kentridge High School 
12430 SE 208th Street
Kent, WA 98031
Directions to Kentridge High School 

Regional Justice Center 
(near parking garage entrance) 
401 4th Avenue N
Kent, WA 98032
Directions to Regional Justice Center 

Kirkland

Kingsgate Library 
12315 NE 143rd Street
Kirkland, WA 98034
Directions to Kingsgate Library 

Kirkland City Hall 
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland, WA 98033
Directions to Kirkland City Hall 

Lake Forest Park

Lake Forest Park City Hall 
17425 Ballinger Way NE
Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
Directions to Lake Forest Park City Hall 

Maple Valley

Hobart Food Market 
20250 276th Avenue SE
Maple Valley, WA 98038
Directions to Hobart Food Market 

Tahoma School District Building* 
25720 Maple Valley-Black Diamond Rd SE
Maple Valley, WA 98038
Directions to Tahoma School District Building* 

Mercer Island

Mercer Island Community & Event Center 
8236 SE 24th Street
Mercer Island, WA 98040
Directions to Mercer Island Community & Event Center 

Newcastle

Newcastle City Hall 
12835 Newcastle Way
Newcastle, WA 98056
Directions to Newcastle City Hall 

Normandy Park

Normandy Park Towne Center 
19901 1st Avenue South
Normandy Park, WA 98148
Directions to Normandy Park Towne Center 

North Bend

North Bend Library 
115 E 4th Street
North Bend, WA 98045
Directions to North Bend Library 

Pacific

Algona-Pacific Library 
255 Ellingson Road
Pacific, WA 98047
Directions to Algona-Pacific Library 

Redmond

Redmond City Hall* 
15670 NE 85th Street
Redmond, WA 98052
Directions to Redmond City Hall* 

Redmond Community Center at Marymoor Village* 
6505 176th Avenue NE
Redmond, WA 98052
Directions to Redmond Community Center at Marymoor Village* 

Renton

Fairwood Library 
17009 140th Avenue SE
Renton, WA 98058
Directions to Fairwood Library 

King County Elections*  
919 SW Grady Way
Renton, WA 98057
Directions to King County Elections* 

Renton Public Health Center* 
3201 NE 7th Street
Renton, WA 98056
Directions to Renton Public Health Center* 

Sammamish

Sammamish City Hall 
801 228th Avenue SE
Sammamish, WA 98075
Directions to Sammamish City Hall 

SeaTac

Valley View Library 
17850 Military Road South
SeaTac, WA 98188
Directions to Valley View Library 

Seattle

Ballard  

Ballard Branch Library 
Corner of NW 57th St and 22nd Ave NW
Seattle, WA 98107
Directions to Ballard Branch Library 

Beacon Hill  

Beacon Hill Library 
2821 Beacon Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98144
Directions to Beacon Hill Library 


NewHolly Neighborhood Campus 
7054 32nd Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98118
Directions to NewHolly Neighborhood Campus 

Broadview/Greenwood  

Broadview Library 
12755 Greenwood Avenue North
Seattle, WA 98133
Directions to Broadview Library 

Bryn Mawr/Skyway  

Skyway Library 
12601 76th Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98178
Directions to Skyway Library 

Capitol Hill  

Seattle Central College 
Broadway-Edison Building 
(northeast corner) 1701 Broadway
Seattle, WA 98122
Directions to Seattle Central College 

Central District  

Garfield Community Center 
2323 E Cherry Street
Seattle, WA 98122
Directions to Garfield Community Center 

Columbia City  

Rainier Community Center 
4600 38th Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98118
Directions to Rainier Community Center 

Downtown  

King County Administration Building 
500 4th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Directions to King County Administration Building 

Fremont/Wallingford  

Waterway 19 Park (next to Gas Works Park) 
2119 N Northlake Way
Seattle, WA 98103
Directions to Waterway 19 Park (next to Gas Works Park) 

Green Lake/Phinney  

Green Lake Community Center 
7201 East Green Lake Drive North
Seattle, WA 98115
Directions to Green Lake Community Center 

International District  

Uwajimaya 
619 6th Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98104
Directions to Uwajimaya 

Lake City  

Lake City Library 
12501 28th Avenue NE
Seattle, WA 98125
Directions to Lake City Library 

Magnolia  

Magnolia Park* 
1461 Magnolia Boulevard West
Seattle, WA 98199
Directions to Magnolia Park* 

Northgate  

North Seattle College 
(south visitor lot access from N 95th St)
9600 College Way N
Seattle, WA 98103
Directions to North Seattle College 

Queen Anne  

Seattle Pacific University Bookstore* 
310 W Bertona Street
Seattle, WA 98119
Directions to Seattle Pacific University Bookstore* 

Rainier Valley  

Rainier Beach Community Center 
8825 Rainier Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98118
Directions to Rainier Beach Community Center 

Sandpoint/Laurelhurst  

Magnuson Park/The Brig* 
6344 NE 74th Street
Seattle, WA 98115
Directions to Magnuson Park/The Brig* 

South Lake Union  

South Lake Union 
310 Terry Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109
Directions to South Lake Union 

South Park  

South Park Library 
8604 8th Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98108
Directions to South Park Library 

University District  

University of Washington Campus 
Schmitz Hall 
(by north entrance on NE 41st St) 
1410 NE Campus Parkway
Seattle, WA 98195
Directions to University of Washington Campus 

West Seattle/Delridge  

Alaska Junction 
Corner of SW Alaska Street and 44th Avenue SW
Seattle, WA 98116
Directions to Alaska Junction 


High Point Library 
3411 SW Raymond Street
Seattle, WA 98126
Directions to High Point Library 

White Center  

White Center Library 
1409 SW 107th Street
Seattle, WA 98146
Directions to White Center Library 

Shoreline

Shoreline Library 
345 NE 175th Street
Shoreline, WA 98155
Directions to Shoreline Library 

Shoreline Park & Ride 
18821 Aurora Avenue N
Shoreline, WA 98113
Directions to Shoreline Park & Ride 

Snoqualmie

Snoqualmie Library 
7824 Center Boulevard SE
Snoqualmie, WA 98065
Directions to Snoqualmie Library 

Tukwila

Tukwila Community Center* 
12424 42nd Avenue South
Tukwila, WA 98168
Directions to Tukwila Community Center* 

Vashon

Vashon Library 
17210 Vashon Hwy SW
Vashon, WA 98070
Directions to Vashon Library 

Woodinville

Woodinville Library 
17105 Avondale Road NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Directions to Woodinville Library 

Information and Images courtesy of KingCounty.gov

It's Seattle Restaurant Week!

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ABOUT SRW

Dine out for a deal during Seattle Restaurant Week, where more than 165 restaurants across greater Seattle area offer a special three-course dinner menu for $33, and many also offer two-course lunches for $18. Prices exclude beverages, tax and gratuity.

To take advantage of these deals, be sure to make your plans Sundays through Thursdays. Seattle Restaurant Week menus are not available Fridays, Saturdays or for Sunday brunch.

Seattle Restaurant Week is a great opportunity to visit the award-winning restaurants you’ve always wanted to try, rediscover old favorites and celebrate the cuisine that makes our region a culinary hot spot.

 

When is Seattle Restaurant Week?

Our fall 2018 promotion is taking place October 21 – November 8, 2018.

 

Are Restaurant Week menus offered every day of the week?

No. Seattle Restaurant Week prices and menus are only available Sundays through Thursdays. If you plan to visit on Fridays, Saturdays or for Sunday brunch, you will not be able to order from the Seattle Restaurant Week menu.

 

What are restaurants offering during Restaurant Week?

Three-course dinner menus typically consist of a starter (soup, salad or appetizer), entrée and dessert. Lunch menus will usually offer either an appetizer and entrée, or entrée and dessert. However, restaurants aren’t required to stick to this format, so the specific courses may vary. In addition, restaurants are required to provide prix fixe dinner options regularly valued at $40 or more, so you really will be getting a good deal.

Menus feature three options per course, including at least one vegetarian choice for each. Menus are subject to change from season to season based on availability of ingredients and the chef’s imagination.

 

Are reservations required?

No, but they are strongly encouraged. You can make your Seattle Restaurant Week reservations via Open Table, and remember that these menus are not available Fridays, Saturdays or for Sunday brunch. So while Open Table will let you make a reservation during these times, you’ll only able to enjoy Seattle Restaurant Week menus and pricing if you dine Sunday (after brunch) through Thursday.

If you’re aren’t sure whether a restaurant is serving their Seattle Restaurant Week menu when you plan on visiting, we recommend that you call them ahead of time.

 

Who do I contact with questions?

Seattle Restaurant Week inquiries: srw@seattletimes.com

Seasonal Events inquiries: andrea@seattlenetwork.org

PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS

Menus and restaurants are being finalized, so keep checking back as we continue to add to the list.

2120

American

Belltown

Adana

Japanese

Capitol Hill

Agrodolce

Italian

Fremont

All Water Seafood & Oyster Bar

Seafood

Downtown

Amaro Bistro

Italian

Bothell

Andaluca

Mediterranean

Downtown

Andiamo Ristorante

Italian

Bellevue

Anthony's HomePort Des Moines

Seafood

Des Moines

Anthony's HomePort Edmonds

Seafood

Edmonds

Anthony's HomePort Kirkland

Seafood

Kirkland

Anthony's Pier 66

Seafood

Downtown

AQUA by El Gaucho

Fine Dining

Belltown

Ballard Annex Oyster House

Seafood

Ballard

Bar Cantinetta

Italian

Madison Park/Madrona

Bar Dojo

Asian

Edmonds

Barking Frog

Pacific Northwest

Woodinville

Barolo Ristorante

Italian

Downtown

Baron's Xi'an Kitchen & Bar

Chinese

Bellevue

Basil's Bistro

Pacific Northwest

Bellevue

Bastille Cafe & Bar

French

Ballard

Blu Sardinia

Italian

Redmond

Blueacre Seafood

Seafood

Downtown

Boca Restobar & Grill

Latin

Capitol Hill

Bodrum Bistro Anatolia Kitchen

Mediterranean

Wallingford

Bottle & Bull

Pacific Northwest

Kirkland

Bramling Cross

American

Ballard

Buenos Aires Grill

Steaks

Belltown

Cafe Campagne

French

Downtown

Cafe Pettirosso

American

Capitol Hill

Cantinetta Bellevue

Italian

Bellevue

Cantinetta Seattle

Italian

Wallingford

CAPITOL CIDER

Pacific Northwest

Capitol Hill

Central Smoke Bar & Smokery

Bbq

Capitol Hill

Chan Seattle

Asian

Downtown

Chavez

Mexican

Capitol Hill

Chinook's at Salmon Bay

Seafood

Ballard

Chiso Sushi

Japanese

Fremont

Cicchetti Kitchen + Bar

Mediterranean

Eastlake/Lake Union

Cinque Terre Ristorante

Italian

Downtown

Coastal Kitchen

Seafood

Capitol Hill

Coho Cafe - Issaquah

Pacific Northwest

Issaquah

Coho Cafe - Redmond

Pacific Northwest

Redmond

Cortina

Italian

Downtown

Crawfish King

Seafood

Downtown

Cuoco

Italian

South Lake Union

Cypress Lounge & Wine Bar

American

Bellevue

Dahlia Lounge

American

Downtown

Daniel's Broiler-Leschi

Steaks

Leschi

Dead Line

Latin

Downtown

Dunbar Room

American

Downtown

El Gaucho Bellevue

Steaks

Bellevue

El Gaucho Seattle

Steaks

Belltown

Elliott's Oyster House

Seafood

Downtown

Epulo Bistro

Italian

Edmonds

Etta's

Seafood

Downtown

Eve Fremont

Pacific Northwest

Fremont

Firenze

Italian

Bellevue

Flying Fish

American

South Lake Union

Frank's Oyster House & Champagne Parlor

American

Ravenna/Roosevelt

Gather Kitchen and Bar

American

Ballard

Girin Ssam Bar

Asian

Downtown

Gracia

Mexican

Ballard

Grappa

Mediterranean

Queen Anne/Seattle Center

Heartwood Provisions

American

Downtown

I See Food

Seafood

Bellevue

IL Bistro

Italian

Downtown

Jep's Chef House at Preservation Kitchen

Global Infusion

Bothell

Kisaku

Japanese

Greenlake

KOKKAKU

Steaks

Wallingford

La Spiga

Italian

Capitol Hill

Lark

American

Capitol Hill

Le Coin

French

Fremont

Le Grand Bistro

French

Kirkland

le Messe

Italian

Eastlake/Lake Union

Lecosho

Pacific Northwest

Downtown

Lilac Cafe

Italian

Kirkland

Lionhead

Chinese

Capitol Hill

Local 360

Pacific Northwest

Belltown

Lola

Greek

Downtown

Luc Restaurant

French

Capitol Hill

Lucia Italian Kitchen + Bar

Italian

Greenlake

Lynn's Bistro

French

Kirkland

Ma'ono

Hawaiian/American

West Seattle

Mamma Melina Ristorante & Pizzeria

Italian

University/Montlake

Margaux Restaurant

Pacific Northwest

Belltown

Marine Hardware

Seafood

Ballard

Marjorie

American

Capitol Hill

Maslow's by Farestart

American

Eastlake/Lake Union

Maximilien

French

Downtown

Mercato Stellina Seattle

Italian

Downtown

Miller's Guild

Steaks

Downtown

Miss Cafe

Turkish Cuisine

Downtown

Mkt

Italian

Wallingford

Moksha

Indian

Bellevue

Monsoon Bellevue

Asian

Bellevue

Monsoon Seattle

Vietnamese

Capitol Hill

Montalcino

Italian

Issaquah

Nell's

Pacific Northwest

Greenlake

Nirmal's

Indian

Downtown

Novilhos Brazilian Steakhouse

Bbq

Bellevue

Ocho

Spanish

Ballard

Old Stove Brewing

Pacific Northwest

Downtown

Omega Ouzeri

Greek

Capitol Hill

Orfeo

Italian

Belltown

Pair

French

Ravenna/Roosevelt

Palace Kitchen

American

Downtown

Palisade Restaurant

Pacific Northwest

Magnolia/Interbay

Park Lane Public House

American

Kirkland

Pomerol

French

Fremont

Poppy

Pacific Northwest

Capitol Hill

Quinn's Pub

American

Capitol Hill

Raccolto

Italian

West Seattle

Red Cedar and Sage

Pacific Northwest

Downtown

Red Cow

French

Madison Park/Madrona

Revolve True Food & Wine Bar

Pacific Northwest

Bothell

Rione XIII

Italian

Capitol Hill

Ristorante Paradiso

Italian

Kirkland

RN74

French

Downtown

Saint Helens Cafe

American

Laurelhurst

Salt & Iron

Pacific Northwest

Edmonds

Salty's at Redondo Beach

Seafood

Des Moines

Salty's on Alki Beach

Seafood

West Seattle

San Fermo

Italian

Ballard

Sand Point Grill

American

Laurelhurst

Sawyer

American

Ballard

ScoutPNW

American

Downtown

Seastar Restaurant and Raw Bar

Seafood

Bellevue

Seatown Market Diner

Seafood

Downtown

Serafina Osteria e Enoteca

Italian

Eastlake/Lake Union

Soi

Thai

Capitol Hill

Staple and Fancy

Italian

Ballard

Steelhead Diner

Seafood

Downtown

Stoneburner

Italian

Ballard

Suite Restaurant & Lounge

American

Bellevue

Sushi Kappo Tamura

Asian

Eastlake/Lake Union

Tamaribar Seattle

Japanese

Capitol Hill

TanakaSan

Asian

Downtown

Tango Restaurant & Lounge

Spanish

Capitol Hill

Tankard & Tun

Pacific Northwest

Downtown

TAPAS LAB

Small Plates

Greenlake

Tavolata Belltown

Italian

Belltown

Tavolata Capitol Hill

Italian

Capitol Hill

Terra Plata

Pacific Northwest

Capitol Hill

The Crab Pot Restaurant and Bar Lake Bellevue

Seafood

Bellevue

The Dining Room at Salish Lodge

Pacific Northwest

Snoqualmie

The Fig & The Judge

American

Downtown

The Fisherman’s Restaurant and Bar

Seafood

Downtown

The Harvest Vine

Spanish

Madison Park/Madrona

The Lakehouse

Pacific Northwest

Bellevue

The Loft cafe & courtyard

Mediterranean

Edmonds

The London Plane

Mediterranean

Downtown

The Melting Pot - Bellevue

Fondue

Bellevue

The Melting Pot - Seattle

Fondue

Queen Anne/Seattle Center

The Olive & Grape

Mediterranean

Greenwood/Phinney

The Tin Table

American

Capitol Hill

The White Swan Public House

Seafood

South Lake Union

Tilth

American

Wallingford

Trellis Restaurant

American

Kirkland

Tribeca

Italian

Downtown

Trove

Asian

Capitol Hill

Twisted Cuban Cafe

Latin

Woodinville

Vendemmia

Italian

Madison Park/Madrona

Vivo 53

Italian

Bellevue

Voila Bistrot

French

Madison Park/Madrona

Volterra, Kirkland

Italian

Kirkland

Water's Table

Asian

Renton

Waterleaf Restaurant & Bar

Pacific Northwest

Tukwila

Wild Ginger

Asian

Downtown

WildFin American Grill Issaquah

American

Issaquah

WildFin American Grill Renton

American

Renton

Yoroshiku

Japanese

Wallingford

Zane + Wylie's

Steaks

Downtown

Your Complete Guide to the Biggest Halloween Parties, Concerts & Performances in Seattle in 2018

65 Major Events You Need to Know About, from This is Halloween to Tacocat

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

Tim Burton's  The Nightmare Before Christmas  is repackaged as a semi-scandalous spectacle for the masses in     This is Halloween    .

Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas is repackaged as a semi-scandalous spectacle for the masses in This is Halloween.

Staying home to watch horror movies is a perfectly suitable way to spend Halloween, but there are also many, many opportunities to go all out this year. Below, we've rounded up 65 major events you should get tickets for ahead of time to avoid the risk of them selling out. Whether you want to wear your costume to a party (like the Fremonster Spectacular), dance to live music (like at a show with Tacocat, Mirrorgloss, and Sleepover Club), see a performance (like This Is Halloween), or eat a fancy meal (like at the Alice B. Toklas Tour and Dinner), we've got you covered. All of the events below are between October 18–31 and cost $15 or more, and there are also more than 300 other options on our complete Halloween calendar.

OCTOBER 18–NOVEMBER 3

PERFORMANCE

The Cabiri's Ghost Game XII: Into the Dark
The Cabiri semi-circus troupe will perform their 12th annual show on the Ghost Game theme. Hear creepy stories and myths musically accompanied by Susan Du Mett of vox vespertinus, Eric Maia of celadon, and Seattle Kokon Taiko. 
Arcadia, Ballard, $25-$45

OCTOBER 19

FOOD & DRINK

Science of Spirits
Discover the science behind your favorite boozy refreshments, and taste samples from local distillers like 3 Howls Distillery, Blackfish Spirits Distillery, Bomond Vodka, Captive Spirits Distilling, and others.
Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, $45

OCTOBER 19–20

HAUNT

Georgetown Haunted History Tour
Discover the creepy secrets that lurk behind the street corners of Georgetown at this ghostly tour.
The Stables, Georgetown, $20/$25

OCTOBER 20

PARTY

The Apocalypse Vampires vs Wolves Halloween Party
Models in freakish ensembles will traipse down the runway, artists will show their work in a juried show, vendors will sell all sorts of wares, and guests can enter a vampires vs. werewolves costume contest. 
Eden, Pioneer Square, $30

Fashionably Undead VIII
Wear your most freakish and fabulous costume to this spooky-ooky party to win appropriately ghoulish prizes. There will also be drinks, live DJs, art installations, and access to Scared to Death: The Thrill of Horror Film
MoPOP, Seattle Center, $30/$33

FOOD & DRINK

Halloween Pub Crawl 2018
Don your Halloween costume and hop around to various Seattle bars for 14 hours at this eighth annual crawl.
Various locations, $15-$25

MUSIC

Fear Factory
The organizers say: "Be ready for a haunt and a thrill. Bring your best costume and rave with us to shirk the late night chill!" In other words, look your spookiest and dance between three stages of live DJ sets.
DiTec Studios, Sodo, $20

OCTOBER 20-NOVEMBER 4

PERFORMANCE

Ghost Party
Dacha will stage another one of their site-specific, interactive productions, this one seasonally appropriate for Halloween: the story of a dead lost soul stuck in an eternal party.
Russian Community Center, Capitol Hill, $15/$25

OCTOBER 21

FILM

MoPOP Matinee: Young Frankenstein
Mel Brooks's sublimely absurd comedy about a reluctant mad scientist (the staggeringly funny Gene Wilder) and his monstrous yet sensitive creation (Peter Boyle) will be shown after a reading from The New Annotated Frankenstein by Leslie S. Klinger and the unveiling of a bust of Mary Shelley.
MoPOP, Seattle Center, $34/$36

OCTOBER 24–31

PERFORMANCE

La Fin — Halloween Kink Cabaret and After Party
Expect a melding of dance, contortion, and aerial arts as the performers of burlesque revue Valtesse bring out their demons for a night of sexy spooks. Dinner is included. 
The Ruins, Queen Anne, $75/$100

OCTOBER 25

FOOD & DRINK

Zoo BOOze & Bites
Support the Zoo Society by enjoying wine, whiskey, beer, and food tastings from local restaurants. There will also be Halloween-y games, raffles, and more. Costumes are highly encouraged. 
Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, Tacoma, $35/$75 

PERFORMANCE

Seattle Radio Theatre: "The War of the Worlds" 80th Anniversary Live Broadcast
You know the story: When it first aired on the radio in 1938, The War of the Worlds scared the living shit out of people who thought the hour-long broadcast of H.G. Wells’s book brought to dramatic aural life was real, mostly because of how it was presented (odd news bulletins that interrupted the program, a supposedly live report with Martians at the scene, more alarming news bulletins involving an alien invasion). Obviously, this could never happen today, but it’s still fun to look back and remember those literally dark (pre–TV/social-media/electronics in general) days. For this special 80th anniversary celebration, Town Hall, Seattle Radio Theatre, and KIRO Radio have banded together to stage a live broadcast of the classic. It will feature live music and sounds effects, plus the voice powers of Dave Ross and other KIRO Radio hosts along with some Seattle Radio Theatre mainstays. LEILANI POLK
SIFF Cinema Egyptian, Capitol Hill, $15

OCTOBER 25–27

PERFORMANCE

Carnevolar IX: VHS - Circus Spectacular and Dance Party
Emerald City Trapeze performers will fly above your head in feats of circus wonder, all while taking you on a gruesome journey through "horror movies of the ages." Come in your costume to look cool on the dance floor after the show. 
Emerald City Trapeze Arts, Sodo, $35/$55

OCTOBER 26

FESTIVALS

FreakNight 2018
Annual high-key wild-out throwdown FreakNight, basically a Halloweentown Coachella, features a whole night of live music, dancing, a market, and a darkly neon environment of scary circus attractions, bizarre sideshow marvels, and carnival rides. 
WaMu Theater, Sodo, $112

FOOD & DRINK

Alice B. Toklas Tour and Dinner
The Hotel Sorrento lays claim to the peculiar honor of having been deemed one of the 13 most haunted hotels in the world by USA Today. Why? It’s said that the specter of late eccentric socialite Alice B. Toklas lurks there; she’s known mostly as the muse and lover of Gertrude Stein (not to mention the progenitor of an apparently killer pot brownie recipe). Toklas lived briefly in Seattle as a teen, and her apparition has been glimpsed roaming the halls of the Sorrento’s fourth floor dressed in flowing white. At this spooky event, the hotel will pay homage to its favorite “permanent resident” with a tour of some of the sites of reported paranormal activity, followed by a prix-fixe dinner inspired by Toklas’s eponymous cookbook. (No word on whether her famous brownies will be served.) JULIANNE BELL
Hotel Sorrento, First Hill, $120

Prohibition Sucks: A Vampire Speakeasy
Blood-sucking vampires meet the Roaring Twenties at this fancy Prohibition-era speakeasy shindig, which requires a "Great Gatsby black tie" dress code and features live music, passed hors d'oeuvres by chef Shawn Martin, and classic era-appropriate craft cocktails "with a vampire twist" from Seattle Bartending. Proceeds benefit the NW Honey Bee Habitat Restoration.
The Factory Luxe, Sodo, $75

MUSIC

Bootie Seattle: A Monster Mash-Up Spectacular
Seattle's only all-mashup dance party throws down for an all-out celebration of the dark and twisted by breaking out Halloween-themed performances and "spooktacular" mashups (as a pre-party for the big day itself), with a midnight costume contest and cash prizes.
Re-bar, Downtown, $15-$20

Brazilian Halloween Boat Party
Shake it on two separate dance floors to Brazilian funk and Latin mixes while the yacht drifts over the smooth waves of Lake Union and Washington. There'll be a full bar to lend you courage for the costume dance-off. 
The Islander Cruise Ship, Downtown, $20

Halloween Hiphop Boat Party
Dance to hiphop, R&B, and old-school jams on a boat this All Hallows' Eve, tunes courtesy of DJ Fly Rich and DJ Tae Xtravagent. Costumes are highly encouraged. 
The Islander Cruise Ship, Downtown, $30/$50

Noise Complaint: Are You Afraid of the Dark, Too?
Ghouls, goblins, and all other Halloween freaks looking for a place to dance away their favorite holiday can do so at this Halloween get-down, which promises "multiple rooms of music," plus a costume contest and spooky visuals and art installations. 
Monkey Loft, Downtown, $30/$35

Stayin' Alive at The Roller Disco
Many live DJs will be scattered about the roller rink supplying groovy cuts for you to dance to in your costume.
Southgate Roller Rink, White Center, $20

PARTY

13th Annual Baila Con Los Diablos Halloween Salsa Party
Channel your passion for Halloween into salsa dancing at this dance competition and party. If you don't feel like entering the competition, you can also just show up in your costume to sip special drinks, see others perform, and enter raffles. 
Salsa N' Seattle Dance Studio, Atlantic, $20

PERFORMANCE

Things That Go HUMP In The Night
The Titillation Sinsations offer you sweetness and frights in a babely, booby show for Halloween. 
Rendezvous, Belltown, $20-$35

OCTOBER 26–27

PARTY

Seduction 2018
Does Halloween give you sexy shivers? Submerge yourself in a haunted shipwreck at the Seattle Erotic Art Festival's party and enjoy dancing, go-go hotties, great performers like Ms. Briq House, the Shanghai Pearl, Whisper de Corvo, and others, plus treats, swag, and salacious art that'll make you sweat. Doll yourself up in your most opulently sinister threads and compete in the costume contest. Your ticket price will help fund the festival next year.
Gallery Erato, Downtown, $40-$175

OCTOBER 26–28

PARTY

Zom-Bees Knees Bash
Undead spirits from the 1920s—including zombie flappers—will haunt this speakeasy Halloween party while Sister Kate Dance Company gives ghoulish dance performances. Wear your best era-appropriate costume, and keep your eyes peeled for a special séance. 
Smith Tower, Pioneer Square, $50

OCTOBER 27

FOOD & DRINK

Witches' Tea
At this Halloween version of the hotel's High Tea service, gather your coven to master potions and spells while sipping tea and tasting assorted sweets like fresh-baked scones, cookies, tea sandwiches, and truffles. Witch and warlock regalia is very much encouraged. 
Hotel Sorrento, First Hill, $39

Yelloween
This classy haunted bash will overfloweth with Veuve Clicquot cocktails, LED cotton candy, and live beats from DJ Pryme Tyme. 
W Hotel, Downtown, $20

MUSIC

Diwaloween
Kill two birds with one very festive stone by celebrating Halloween and India's festival of lights in the same night. Hear music from Canadian dhol player 2faanmusic, dance to Bollywood music from DJ Aanshul and DJ TAMM, enter a costume contest, wear free glow necklaces, and eat free candy. 
Crocodile, Belltown, $15/$25

Halloween Latin Boat Party
Shake it on two separate dance floors to reggaeton, hiphop, dance music, and Latin mixes from DJs Luna and Geo while the yacht drifts over the smooth waves of Lake Union and Washington. There'll be a full bar to lend you courage for the costume dance-off. 
The Islander Cruise Ship, Downtown, $25-$100

Hip Hop Halloween Boat Party
Cruise around local waters dancing to your hiphop favorites, in your costume. 
The Spirit of 76, South Lake Union, $60-$150

Opulent Temple: Gothica
Opulent Temple will host this eerie gothic bacchanalia with an intimate area of music, costumes, and dancing provided by DJs HOJ, Billy Casazza, Grammar, Ian Powers, and Chris Tower, all amidst the trappings of an underworld costume party. 
Eden, Sodo, $30-$34

PARTY

BeautyBoiz go BOO, pt. 4
Make your Halloween as queer as possible with Forward Flux and Beautyboiz, featuring Kimber Shade's runway show, dance by Purple Lemonade and others, Rajah Makonnen's large-scale digital projection art, and a DJ duel between DJ Ricki Leigh and DJ Reeces Pieces. There'll be plenty of cherished queens to lead the festivities in gory, heroic, fantasy, alien, and fetish drag: Sativa, Hera Diamandis, Old Witch, Better Wetter, and many others. 
Fred Wildlife, Refuge Capitol Hill, $20/$25

Black Cat Ball
Raise money for the kitties at Purrfect Pals by wearing a feline masquerade disguise and dancing the evening away after enjoying a three-course dinner and live auction. 
Meydenbauer Center, Bellevue, $150

Fremonster Spectacular
Halloween party people will be glad to know that Fremont's Halloweekend bash will return with even more DJs, live performances, tricks, treats, goblins, and inventive booze creations than ever before. Expect Valtesse go-go dancers, fog machines in every corner, bondage and suspension performances from Seattle Shibari, live sets from DJs Jeromy Nail and Kipprawk, a costume contest, and more. 
Fremont Foundry, Fremont, $55/$99

Halloween Party + Costume Contest!
Indisputable reality TV legend Tiffany "New York" Pollard will grace Seattle as the host of a costume contest with local drag talents Nebraska Thunderfuck and La Saveona Hunt (so look your absolute best). After the contest, get down to spooky town with DJ Nitty Gritty.
Queer/Bar, Capitol Hill, $15-$350

HAUNT: The Ultimate Halloween Bash
Dance the night away with 2,000 other people at what claims to be "Seattle's largest, hottest and most anticipated" Halloween party. There will also be a costume contest with a $1000 prize for the best overall winner, so put some effort into it. 
MoPOP, Seattle Center, $39-$149

Hybrid Halloween Costume Party
KISS FM hosts Carla Marie and Anthony will host this Halloween bash, complete with costume contests and live DJs. 
Baltic Room, Capitol Hill, $50/$100

Reboot Theatre Company Presents Halloween IV: FOURboding...
The Reboot Theatre Company will put on a fun, dancy, boozy time for you and raise money for their own programs. Eat Plaza Garibaldi's Mexican food, try your luck in a raffle, and partake of the open bar. 
Sodo Pop, Sodo, $50/$60

Seattle Opera Halloween Party
After The Turn of the Screw, head backstage in your costume for food, drinks, dancing, and more with Seattle Opera. 
McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, $35

The Shop of Horrors Halloween Party
Look your most monster-y for a costume contest and dance party. Look out for fire dancers swiveling their flame sticks. 
Derby, Sodo, $30-$50

Voodoo on the Bayou Halloween Costume Party
This New Orleans-inspired Halloween party will have live jazz, live painting from Chris Kelleher, tarot readings by Angela Maria-Fava, a drag performance by Sylvia O'Stayformore and her "voodoo vixens," and more mystical fun.
Sanctuary at Admiral, West Seattle, $75-$1,000

PERFORMANCE

Tits or Treats—A Halloween Hextravaganza
Enjoy a night of "dancing, singing, stripping, howling, boos, boobs, and booze" in Columbia City at this Halloween cabaret.
Columbia City Theater, Columbia City, $25-$160

SPORTS & RECREATION

Magnuson Halloween Run
Take part in a 5, 10, or 15K course in your costume, then stick around for a post-race selfie wall and "haunted beer and warmer garden."
Magnuson Park, North Seattle, $22-$32

Monster Dash 5K
Walk or run a 5K dressed as a monster, then release your excess ghoulish energy in a post-race dance party. 
UW Campus, University District, $10-$20

Thrill the World Redmond
Zombify yourself and join the rest of the horde to perform the "Thriller" dance to raise money for Team Survivor Northwest. There will also be a photo booth, costume contest, and live music. 
Redmond Town Center, $20-$40

THROUGH OCTOBER 27

PERFORMANCE

The Turn of the Screw
In 1954, English composer Benjamin Britten (1913–1976) premiered his opera based on Henry James's ghost story The Turn of the Screw. Its music is darkly gorgeous, jolting, manic at times, and often outright scary. In key sequences involving the children in the story, the atonal sounds float like a ghost in a room of mirrors. Anyone familiar with the Portishead track “Cowboys” will already have a good sense of how this echo-stark opera sounds. Because the opera is as much about ghosts as sexual abuse of women and children, it provides new and important meanings for our #MeToo moment. CHARLES MUDEDE
McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, $25-$314

OCTOBER 28

FESTIVALS

Spooktacular Moisture Festival Auction
Raise money for 2019's Moisture Festival of variety and circus arts at this costumed party featuring a silent and live auction, catered meal, and showcase of Moisture Festival performers. 
Hale's Palladium, Fremont, $85

PERFORMANCE

Ho-lloween Burlesque
Local burlesque favorites Violet Tendencies, Mx. Pucks A'Plenty, Smokey Brown the Clown, and others will keep you entertained during this sexy-spooky Halloween show. 
Gay City, Capitol Hill, $15-$30

SPORTS & RECREATION

Run Scared
Wear a costume that's both spooky and breathable to the annual Run Scared 5/10K around Seward Park. Proceeds benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. 
Seward Park, Rainier Valley, $50/$55

OCTOBER 31

FILM

Collide-O-Scope Halloween
Spend the holiday experiencing a delightfully freaky, swirly montage of music and mayhem made of found-footage phantasmagoria from the archives of the cheeky Collide-O-Scope duo, Shane Wahlund and Michael Anderson. Come in costume—they may bestow one of their much-coveted prizes upon you! And keep your breath bated for their special surprise guest! After the show, head to an afterparty at Bill's Off-Broadway to process the trippy mayhem in your brain. 
SIFF Cinema Egyptian, Capitol Hill, $18

MUSIC

La Luz, Shy Boys
Reliably excellent surf rock group La Luz will return to their original hometown for a rowdy Halloween show with opening support from psych-pop band Shy Boys. 
Crocodile, Belltown, $20

A Rambling Halloween with the Sadies
The Sadies love American country almost as much as they love American punk, although their shows sometimes out-punk their records, and their guitars sometimes out-punk their voices. ANDREW HAMLIN 
Sunset Tavern, Ballard, $20

Rusko! Halloween Night
Dubstep DJ Rusko will spin bass-heavy beats for costumed partiers. 
Aston Manor, Downtown, $20-$30

Tacocat, Mirrorgloss, Sleepover Club
It’s been pretty dark lately, huh? Weeks (months, years…) of deeply impactful, negative news plastered everywhere you look can really drag a person down. I think we all deserve to feel lighter, more mobile, more buoyed by the season. Tacocat can raise you to that level. I’ve been attending their shows for a decade now, and I can attest to the health benefits of witnessing their neon-candy punk-pop explode through an ecstatic crowd. Join them and local power cuties Mirrorgloss and Sleepover Club for a wild night out, and don’t forget your costume—these bands will surely be decked out in some Technicolor fantasy looks.   KIM SELLING 
Chop Suey, Capitol Hill, $15/$18

The True Loves, Mother of Pearl, Emerald City Soul Train
Eight-piece instrumental soul group The True Loves, often seen backing singer Grace Love, focus on tight grooves and modern soul motions influenced by the generations of the genre before them. KIM SELLING 
Neumos, Capitol Hill, $15

PARTY

All Hallow's Eve Party
This opulent/gory space will offer Halloween cocktails, a live swing band, aerial performances, and a live DJ.
The Ruins, Queen Anne, $25

A Haunted All Hallows Eve - Ghost Tour and Halloween Party
Hotel Sorrento is infamously riddled with ghosts. Hear stories from its past by taking a haunted tour, then keep the mood going with a dance party, a costume contest, and cocktails. 
Hotel Sorrento, First Hill, $20

Scary Ferry
Take a haunted boat ride on Lake Union, and wear a costume to win cool prizes. 
The Hiyu Ferry, Eastlake, $50

THROUGH OCTOBER 31

PERFORMANCE

Beware the Terror of Gaylord Manor
The world-famous Seattle-based drag queen BenDeLaCreme has written and performed three acclaimed solo shows, but Beware the Terror of Gaylord Manor is the artist's first foray into writing, directing, and starring in an original play of her own. It's a spooky, campy twist on the horror flick genre, featuring ghosts, dancers, music, and special effects. It first premiered last year for a sold-out run at ACT, and returns this year surely with a few of its kinks worked out. The chemistry between BenDeLaCreme and Scott Shoemaker alone is worth the price of admission. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE
ACT Theatre, Downtown, $40-$76

The Dark Circus
Sinister acrobatics and lavish costumes by Dark Circus will get you in that extravagant Halloween mood.
Snoqualmie Casino, Snoqualmie, $15-$40

Night Parade
The oldest Asian American theater group in the Pacific Northwest is teaming up with one of the area's youngest Asian American-led theater groups to bring you an immersive theatrical experience that sounds perfect for people who want to indulge in the season’s devilry. The drama, which will unfold at a secret TBA location in Seattle, follows a demon-obsessed artist named Shunkuno Arashi, whose life story is partially based on Yayoi Kusama (Instagram it), as well as a Japanese folktale about demons parading down the street and stealing people. So, uh, keep your head on a swivel. RICH SMITH
Venue provided with RSVP, $30

This Is Halloween
It's Tim Burton's classic The Nightmare Before Christmas repackaged as a semi-scandalous spectacle for the masses. The audience eats chicken skewers and knocks back $10 cocktails while they watch Tim Keller as Jack "the Pumpkin King" Skellington sing and dance, cabaret-style, along with Luminous Pariah, Paris Original, Marissa Quimby, and Baby Kate, while a ghoulish orchestra pumps out the show's signature tunes. Despite the glitzy and consumerist exterior, the crew manages to smuggle a complicated cabaret about the horror of fixed identities into the unpretentious space of the Triple Door. RICH SMITH
Triple Door, Downtown, $29-$49

The Witching Hour
Occultists gather in an esoteric library and conjure the monsters of Harm, Loneliness, Failure, Filth, and Chaos in this Halloween dinner show created by Terry Podgorski and Erin Brindley. They promise scares, beautiful design, and a touch of kitsch.
Nordo’s Culinarium, Pioneer Square, $79

Zombie Cheerleaders from Hell
The Heavenly Spies are back with their annual Halloween show featuring scary hot dancers—plus "terrifying masks and pretty pasties, black cats and twerking booties, sweet transvestites and dancing cuties."
Can Can, Downtown, $35-$95

Plant A Tree At Kirkland's Arbor Day Celebration

Celebrating Arbor Day is an opportunity to recognize trees for their contribution to our community.

By News Desk, News Partner | Oct 13, 2018 6:10 pm ET

shutterstock__vovan-1539468606-9831.jpg

From the City of Kirkland: The City of Kirkland invites you to come plant a tree at Kirkland's annual Arbor Day celebration and forest restoration event taking place at North Rose Hill Woodlands Park on Saturday, October 20, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Arbor Day event volunteers are invited to support the stewardship efforts of the Green Kirkland Partnership by planting native trees, shrubs and ground covers and removing aggressive invasive plants. EarthCorps, a partner organization, will lead the event's forest restoration activities. Tools, gloves and training will be provided. This year, the Kirkland PCC Community Market and Little Caesar's Pizza are sponsoring lunch for the volunteers. 

At 12:00 p.m., Kirkland Mayor Amy Walen, Ben Thompson from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Green Kirkland Partnership Program Supervisor Jodie Galvan and Kirkland Urban Forester Deb Powers will conduct a ceremonial Arbor Day tree planting. Following the ceremonial planting, forest restoration efforts will resume until 2 p.m.

Celebrating Arbor Day is an opportunity to recognize trees for their contribution to our community: trees filter rainwater and store carbon; they feed and shelter birds and other wildlife; they shade and cool our homes and neighborhoods, thus saving energy; and they form a living green canopy, contributing to our health, well-being and quality of life.

The North Rose Hill Woodlands Park restoration site is located at 9930 124 Avenue NE in Kirkland. Sign up to volunteer online through greenkirkland.org.

For more information, please contact Deb Powers, Urban Forester for the City of Kirkland, at dpowers@kirklandwa.gov or (425) 587-3261.

Image via Shutterstock/ Vovan

Best Pumpkin Patches and Corn Mazes for Seattle and Eastside Families

Where to pick the perfect pumpkin, catch a hay ride, pet farm animals and find more harvest fun

Courtesy of ParentMap.com

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Every year when the leaves start to turn we find ourselves wanting to make a farm pilgrimage with the kids to visit a pumpkin patch and mark the harvest. Farmers all over the region oblige our collective need by carving intricate mazes into their cornfields and offering hay rides out to the pumpkin fields.

Pumpkin patch experiences vary widely. Purists can pick their gourds at a farm that offers little more than hot cider as a side activity, while families looking for a more carnival atmosphere can visit farms and pumpkin patches tricked out like amusement parks — the offerings get a little wilder each year.

This list is big! It's organized by region. First, find 10 Snohomish County pumpkin patches, then nine Eastside and South King County-area pumpkin patches. For even more pumpkin-picking options, check out our South Sound pumpkin patch picks.

10 Snohomish County pumpkin patches

Stocker Farms.

Stocker Farms.

1. Stocker Farms, Snohomish

Known for: Huge pumpkin patch, corn maze and "Stalker" Farms night maze.

Patch action: Starting in October, this Snohomish County farm is open daily. Grab a wagon and head into the fields or choose from pre-sorted pumpkins on the lawn. On weekends, head across the street to the Family Adventure Farm, featuring a 10-acre corn maze, pumpkin cannon, jumping pillow, hayrides, animal barn, crafts, rubber duck races, face painting and other activities. This year's maze theme all about honoring local heroes and showcasing the impact their selfless acts have had on the community. New this year on select weekends is the Stocker Farms first ever Sunflower Jubilee; U-pick sunflowers of all varieties and fabulous flowery photo ops!

For older kids looking for a scare, there’s Stalker Farms, which has two walk-through haunt experiences and a Zombie stalker paintball ride. This is the ultimate horror attraction and only recommended for brave 12-year-olds and up.

Dates and hours: Pumpkin patch open starting Saturday, Sept. 29. The Family Adventure Farm is open Tuesday–Sunday starting Sept. 29, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Night Maze open beginning Oct. 6. Check Facebook page for updates. The Sunflower Jubilee is Oct. 6–7 and Oct. 13–14. 

Location, cost and details: 8705 Marsh Road, Snohomish; 360-568-7391; Family Adventure Farm mid-week admission is $10.95/person; weekend admission is $14.95/person; ages 2 and under always free. Entry to just the pumpkin patch is free; pay only for pumpkins. Corn Maze is $21.95/person. The Sunflower Jubilee is $19.95/person which includes a u-pick sunflower bouquet. Save by buying tickets online.

A Minion hayride at Craven Farm. Photo credit: Craven Farm

A Minion hayride at Craven Farm. Photo credit: Craven Farm

2. Craven Farm, Snohomish

Known for: Overall fantastic farm with fun play area for the littles; big- and small-sized corn mazes.

Patch action: Named Washington State's best pumpkin patch by "Readers Digest," this farm is justifiably very popular, especially with younger kids. The farm market area doubles as a play area with vehicles, tractors and pirate ships to climb on; there is also a snack bar open on weekends and picnic tables. Pick some pumpkins in the field, get lost in the 15-acre corn maze that's themed Alice in Pumpkinland, take a hayride through Minionville and visit the farm animals. Also check out the new Adventure Maze, complete with an obstacle course and farm-related trivia! Select Fridays in October check out the Night Owl (non-scary) Corn Maze. 

Dates and hours: Open daily, Sept. 22–Oct. 31, 9:30 a.m. to dusk (6:30ish). Hayride, apple slinger, face painting, Snack Shack and Espresso Shop are open on weekends only. Night Owl Maze open from 6–9 p.m. on select nights in October. Check Facebook page for updates.

Location, cost and details: 13817 Short School Road, Snohomish. 360-568-2601. Admission is free; corn maze $8 (age 2 and under free); adventure maze $7; Night Owl corn maze $15; duck races $3 per duck; hayride $6; apple slinger $0.75 each; minigolf and human foosball $5. New supersaver wristbands available this year, $10–$20.
 

The Farm at Swan's Trail. Photo credit:    Alvin Smith   , via Flickr CC

The Farm at Swan's Trail. Photo credit: Alvin Smith, via Flickr CC

3. The Farm at Swan's Trail, Snohomish

Known for: Washington State corn maze and huge play area.

Patch action: Another Snohomish farm that has it all, from its Washington State Corn Maze — a 12-acre map of the state that shows actual roads, places and towns — to wagon rides, a "cow train", a large petting zoo and a playground. And, of course, pumpkin-picking in the 45-acre pumpkin patch. The Farm also has U-pick apples, and on weekends there are plenty of mouth-watering fresh baked goods. Insider tip: The Farm at Swan's Trail has private rooms popular for birthday parties.

Dates and hours: Open from Sept. 29–Oct. 31, noon–6 weekdays and 10 a.m.–6 p.m. on weekends. (Due to field-trip scheduling call ahead for availability on weekdays). Check Facebook page for updates.

Location, cost and details: 7301 Rivershore Drive, Snohomish; 425-334-4124. Parking and admission is free and includes Pig Show, Duck Race & Petting Farm. The corn maze is $8 on weekdays and $10 on weekends (ages 4 and under free); play passes range from $8–$18 (adults and ages 2 and under free for the Children's Play Area).

Bob's Corn maze. Photo credit: Bob's Corn Maze and Pumpkins

Bob's Corn maze. Photo credit: Bob's Corn Maze and Pumpkins

4. Bob's Corn & Pumpkin Farm, Snohomish

Known for: Reservable firepits in the corn maze, kid mazes, tasty snacks.

Patch action: A free hayride takes visitors through the 30-acre pumpkin patch and amusements include corn pit, slides, farm animals, face painting and an apple cannon (not all activities available during the week). Pick a pumpkin from the large U-pick field and buy harvest-themed farm goods such as corn stalks and gourds, all GMO-free. There are two corn mazes: a 10-acre corn maze, where your group can reserve a fire pit for hours of fun (they will build and maintain the fire for you as well as transport any roasting sticks and supplies you bring), and two smaller mazes for the little ones. 

Dates and hours: Maze opens Sept. 8, pumpkin patch open from Sept. 22–Oct. 31, 10 a.m. 'til dark. Day maze open daily 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Nighttime maze (non-scary) open Fridays and Saturdays in October, from 6–10 p.m. (reserve a fire pit!). Activities limited on weekdays. Check Facebook page for updates.

Location, cost and details: 10917 Elliott Road, Snohomish, 360-668-2506. Admission to the pumpkin patch (including hay ride, trike track and play area) is free; day maze $10, $50/family: 24 months and under free. Night maze is $15, $75/family; ages 2 and under free. Cow train is $3/ride; apple cannon is $2/shot or $10 for 10 shots. Combo package wristbands available for multiple activities $10–$20. Military and group discounts available.

5. Carleton Farm, Lake Stevens

Known for: Fun for younger kids, including a kids' corn maze and zip swing. Plus pumpkin cannon!

Patch action: This year's 4-acre maze is a puzzle of trails in which you play two games at the same time! One is Farm Scene Investigation (FSI, a Carleton favorite) where you try to find the missing Farmer Joe. The other, new this year, is a Mariners trivia game. Check the website for upcoming details! Also enjoy the maze by night (non-scary) on certain nights in October; be sure to bring your own flashlight! On weekends, enjoy a zip swing and slides in the Kids Korral, shoot the pumpkin cannon, and take hayrides or bucket train rides.

Teens and adults looking for a thrill may want to check out Carleton's Fright Farm Friday and Saturday nights. Scary attractions include Zombie Paintball, Zombie Farm and the Haunted Swamp. Purchase tickets online and choose your desired timeslot.

Dates and hours: Open daily, Sept. 29–Oct. 31, 10 a.m.–6 p.m., last day maze entry at 5 p.m. Extended activities on weekends. Night maze (fire pit rentals available) open Friday–Saturday nights in October, 7–9 p.m. The Haunted Swamp, Zombie Farm and Zombie Paintball are open Friday–Saturday nights in October (and also the Sunday before Halloween and Halloween day).

Location, cost and details: 830 Sunnyside Blvd. S.E., Lake Stevens, 425-334-2297. Admission and parking are free. Corn maze $8 (3 and under free); Zipline wristband $11; Kids Play wristband $12; night maze $14; Fright Farm attractions $14–$21 (combo packages available).  Pumpkin cannons $2–$3. Check website for pricing updates

6. Thomas Family Farm, Snohomish

Known for: Zombie paintball, haunted hayride (!), monster truck rides, kiddie paintball and more.

Patch action: On weekdays, you can pick a pumpkin but on weekends you can hop a free hayride or play in Kid Land, with rubber duck races, putt-putt golf and a hay maze. Other daytime activities include: monster truck rides, gem-mining, kids' paintball blast and an apple cannon. There is a 3-mile treasure hunt corn maze as well as a .3 mile corn maze for younger kids. Or explore the maze at night with flashlights (non-scary). This farm, however, may be the place to take horror-loving teens, as it is home to the Zombie Paintball Safari Hayride, and the Nightmare on 9 haunted house.

Dates and hours: Opening Saturday, Oct. 6 and open weekends in October, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Nighttime hours are Thursdays and Sundays, 6–10 p.m. starting Oct. 14, and Fridays and Saturdays, 6 p.m.–midnight, starting Oct. 6. Also open Halloween night from 6–10 p.m. Check Facebook page for updates.

Location, cost and details: 9010 Marsh Road, Snohomish, 360-568-6945. Kid Land admission $7; ages 2 and under free, parents free; Treasure Hunt corn maze $7; kids' corn maze $3; other daytime activities $3–$8. Flashlight maze $14; Zombie paintball $22, (timed tickets available online or at ticket booth), Nightmare on 9 haunted house tickets can be purchased in a combo package for $30–$36 or as single tickets on site or online for $10–$20. Discount weekends include Grandparents weekend (Oct. 6–7) and Service weekend (Oct. 13–14). See website for details.

7. Biringer's Black Crow Pumpkin Patch and Corn Maze, Arlington

Known for: Dog-friendliness — dogs on leash, only.

Patch action: Join Gary and Julie Biringer for their annual pumpkin patch and corn maze, featuring a pet-friendly pumpkin patch, 5-acre corn maze, free trolley rides to U-pick pumpkins, kiddie hay maze, slides, covered wagon for picnics and skeleton graveyard. Local honey, cider, apples and fresh corn (seasonal) available. “After Dark” Corn Maze is available for private groups of 50 or more and must be booked in advance.

Dates and hours: Open daily Sept. 29–Oct. 31. Monday–Friday, 11 a.m.–6, p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Night maze by appointment only.

Location, cost and details: 2431 Hwy 530 N.E., Arlington, 360-435-5616. Admission free (includes covered wagon and trolley rides, pumpkin bowling and kiddie hay maze). Call for further pricing details; family passes and group rates available.

 

Foster's Produce and Corn Maze. Photo credit: Foster's website

Foster's Produce and Corn Maze. Photo credit: Foster's website

8. Foster's Produce and Corn Maze, Arlington

Known for: Funny goats, large pumpkin patch.

Patch action: This fourth-generation, family-owned farm features a 10-acre Wizard of Oz–themed corn maze and huge U-pick pumpkin patch and goat walk open daily. Weekends, enjoy cow barrel train rides, pumpkin cannon blaster, pumpkin slingshot and more. Hit the target on the slingshot and receive a free ice cream cone! 

Dates and hours: Corn maze and patch open daily Oct. 1–31, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. (last admission to maze is at 4 p.m.) Farm Market open daily starting September 15th. Most activities Saturdays and Sundays only. Check the Facebook page for updates.

Location, cost and details: 5818 SR 530 N.E., Arlington; 360-435-6516. Corn maze $6 (ages 3 and under free); pumpkin cannon $2/shot or $10/10 shots; pumpkin slingshot $2/3 shots; cow train $4. Activity bundles available on weekends.

9. Bailey Family Farm, Snohomish

Known for: Tons of U-pick veggies, including pumpkins, and simple farm fun.

Patch action: This 100+-year-old family farm features simple farm fun. There's a great pumpkin patch plus loads of veggies to pick, including Red Jonagold apples to pick Sept. 29–30! Bailey Farm does not have a corn maze in there's a free play area with a hay climb, rope swing, trikes, toy tractors and a sandbox.

Dates and hours: The pumpkin patch is open daily beginning Sept. 29, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. Turn up on weekends for activities, including free hay rides and cider and kettle corn for purchase.

Location, cost and details: 12711 Springhetti Rd., Snohomish; 360-568-8826. Free entry to farm; pumpkins and other produce for purchase; snacks for purchase.

10. Fairbank Animal Farm and Pumpkin Patch, Edmonds

Known for: Barnyard experience for tots — kids might even view chicks hatching!

Patch action: Another experience geared to younger kids, this rustic farm offers rough paths and barnyard smells, and the kids can get their fill of baby animals to watch, feed and pet, including chicks, ducklings, goats, ponies, rabbits and pigs. There is also a U-pick pumpkin patch, tiny tot "maize maze," the Hidden Bear Trail to Pumpkin Land and a hay tunnel.

Dates and hours: Open weekends in October, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Locations, cost and details: 15308 52nd Ave. W., Edmonds. 425-743-3694. Admission $3/person (ages 10 months and up). Parking is free. Cash only; no credit/debit cards accepted.
 

9 Eastside and South King County pumpkin patches

Jubilee Farm pumpkins. Credit: Elisa Murray

Jubilee Farm pumpkins. Credit: Elisa Murray

1. Jubilee Farm, Carnation

Known for: Affordable fun, horse-drawn hayrides out to the pumpkin fields; awesome organic pumpkins and other gourds; and a pumpkin trebuchet (catapult).

Patch action: Jubilee Biodynamic Farm grows organic produce and celebrates fall with lots of free harvest activities including its now-famous trebuchet — a giant pumpkin catapult. Take a hayride out to the U-pick pumpkin fields, buy lunch or hot cider in the concessions area, visit the farm animals and do a kids' hay maze in the barn loft.

Dates and hours: Open weekends in October, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Check for updates on the Facebook page.

Location, cost and details: 229 W. Snoqualmie River Road N.E., Carnation. 425-222-4558. Admission, parking and most activities free. No pets allowed, please.

Steam train ride at Remlinger Farms. Photo credit: Remlinger Farms

Steam train ride at Remlinger Farms. Photo credit: Remlinger Farms

2. Remlinger Farms, Carnation

Known for: An amusement park that young kids adore plus awesome hay maze fun, U-pick pumpkins and great service

Patch action: Remlinger buzzes with activity during its Fall Harvest Festival weekends in October. Take a wagon ride out to the U-pick pumpkin fields, shop in the farm market and explore the corn maze. Head to the Family Fun Park for entertainment (watch popular entertainer Cyndi Soup in the Farm Theater) and more than 25 rides from a small (but thrilling) roller coaster to a tot-size ferris wheel to pony rides, antique pedal car rides and more. Kids can also climb on tractors and an old school bus, scale a fort and do a hay maze (or just jump in the hay). There are lots of picnic spots at Remlinger, but you're supposed to buy food on the premises — there is a snack bar and full restaurant. 

Dates and hours: Fall Harvest Festival runs Sept. 29–Oct. 28, on weekends 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Find updates on the Facebook page.

Location, cost and details: 32610 N.E. 32nd St., Carnation,  425-333-4135. Free admission to pumpkin patch. Fall Harvest Festival Park admission $22.50 (under age 1 free). Check website for details; discounts for seniors and disabled persons.

Oxbow Farm trail. Credit: Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center

Oxbow Farm trail. Credit: Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center

3. Oxbow Farm & Conservaton Center, Carnation

Known for: Sustainably grown  pumpkins, Living Playground and Kids' Farm.

Patch action: Oxbow isn't just a farm, it's a sustainable education center that stars in both farm fun and education. Pick up pumpkins, including many lovely varieties for cooking and baking, shop for organic produce, take a hayride, take a kids' tour of the farm and try the scavenger hunt. Some activities have fee, payable by "magic bean." Buy magic beans on site.

Dates and hours: Farm and pumpkin patch open Oct. 4–28, Thursday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Oxtober Pumpkin Festival weekends Oct. 7–29, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Check Facebook page for updates.

Location, cost and details: 10819 Carnation-Duvall Road N.E., Carnation. Use the west entrance and follow these directions as Google will mislead you. 425-788-1134. Admission free; select activities have fee. Licensed service animals only.

Baxter Barn

Baxter Barn

4. Baxter Barn, Fall City

Known for: Miniature donkeys and other farm animals.

Patch action: You have to make an appointment to visit Baxter Barn, a local farm focused on sustainable farming practices, but it's well worth it. Kids will love seeing the horses, mini-donkeys, chickens, pheasants and quail. In October, beyond picking pumpkins, you can take a tractor ride, buy certified salmon-safe eggs and take a learning tour of the farm. Call to make an appointment.

Dates and hours: Tours are generally available between the hours of 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday throughout October. Call to make a reservation 425-765-7883. See website for more details. Check Facebook page for updates.

Location, cost and details: 31929 S.E. 44th St., Fall City. 425-765-7883. Tours by appointment. $8/person, including visits with the animals (petting the miniature donkeys is a special treat). Minimum $24. Tractor rides are extra. Note: onsite parking limited to three cars.

5. Fall City Farms, Fall City

Known for: Cider press and glassworks display.

Patch action: Bring your kids to watch cider being pressed and doughnuts sizzling. Meet the cows and donkeys, enjoy a wagon ride, pick a pumpkin from the patch, then check out the autumn-themed glassworks display by Made in Washington.

Dates and hours: Fall City Farm is open Sept. 29–Oct. 28, Fridays 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Saturdays 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sundays 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Check Facebook page for updates.

Location, cost and details: 3636 Neal Road, Fall City. 425-246-5249. Free entry, with produce and other fall food for sale.

6. Fox Hollow Farm, Issaquah

Known for: Petting farm, tractor rides and pony rides. 

Patch action: This well-groomed farm in Issaquah is a guaranteed hit, especially with younger kids. Its popular Fall Festival includes a pumpkin patch, ATVs and race track, corn bin, pony rides, hay maze, inflatables, a haunted forest trail and bonfires with s'mores and concessions including the recently added Espresso Cafe. Come in costume for trick-or-treating. New this year is a good ol' hayride and pumpkin bowling! Starting the end of September, you can also bring your kids to watch the salmon running up the creek.

Dates and hours: Open Wednesday–Sunday, Sept. 28–Oct. 27 (closed Oct. 4). Weekdays from 10 a.m.–3 p.m. and weekends from 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (Sunday, Oct. 7 early closure at 1 p.m.). Purchase advance tickets online as they tend to sell out. Special Halloween Carnival on Oct. 27 from 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Check website calendar and Facebook page for updates. 

Locations, cost and details: 12031 Issaquah-Hobart Road S.E., Issaquah. 253-459-9095. Weekend admission $50 for a car with up to seven people. Weekday admission — Wednesday–Friday — is $10 per person (under age 1 free). Admission includes all activities except the new hayride which is an additional $4.

Kelsey Creek Farm

Kelsey Creek Farm

7. Kelsey Creek Farm, Bellevue

Known for: Fab and free fall festival; farm animals to see all year-round.

Attractions: This city farm hosts the very popular Kelsey Creek Farm Fair on Saturday, Oct. 6. Kids can check out the goats, chickens, and rabbits and take a tractor ride through the farm, bounce in the inflatables or choose a pre-picked pumpkin from a hillside to decorate. If you miss the festival, Kelsey Creek offers scheduled tours (for ages 2 and up) year-round with pumpkin patch tours and firsthand experiences with farm chores and crafts. 

Dates and hours: The Kelsey Creek Farm Fair is Saturday, Oct. 6, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Check for updates on the Facebook page. The surrounding park and playground are open year-round, dawn to dusk. Farm animals can be seen in the pastures every day from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Location, cost and details: Admission is free, and costs for food and activities vary. Cash only. 410 130 Pl. S.E., Bellevue. On festival day, free shuttle service is available from Wilburton Park and Ride, 720 114 Ave. S.E. and Bannerwood Sports Park, 1630 132nd Ave. S.E. 425-452-7688. Dogs not allowed in barnyard area.

8. Carpinito Brothers, Kent

Known for: Roasted corn, kettle corn and huge array of pumpkins.

Patch action: Carpinito Brothers offer U-pick pumpkins, two giant corn mazes and yummy harvest snacks like roasted corn on the cob. With a new design every year, this year's intricately designed maze features a dinosaur theme! Visit the Farm Fun Yard across the street to visit the farm animals, take a tractor-drawn hay ride, race rubber ducks, explore the hay maze, feed the goats on the goat walk and "swim" in the corn pen. 

Dates and hours: Open daily Sept. 28–Oct. 31, 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Check Facebook for updates.

Location, cost and details: Patch and corn maze: 27508 W. Valley Hwy N., Kent. Farm Fun Yard: 6720 S 277th St., Kent. 253-854-5692. Call for pricing details. No pets, please!

Darigold-themed corn maze

Darigold-themed corn maze

9. Thomasson Family Farm, Enumclaw 

Known for: Huge corn maze, corn box for kids and tractor train rides.

Patch action: Another reader favorite in South King County, this working dairy farm runs a 216,000-square-foot corn maze during pumpkin season, plus old-fashioned farm attractions such as apple-lobbing slingshot competitions, tractor train rides, hay rides, hay maze, duck races, petting farm, a corn box (filled with nine tons of corn) for the kids and more. A returning favorite: Solve the mystery in the Pacific Northwest-themed maze or try laser tag.

Dates and hours: Open daily, Oct. 1–31, 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. (Check Facebook page for updates.)

Location, cost and details: 38223 236th Ave. S.E., Enumclaw; 360-802-0503. Multiple packages ranging from $3–$12 on weekdays and $5–$20 on weekends depending on activities chosen. Free parking. See website for details. No pets allowed.

Pumpkin picking tips:

  • Bring hand sanitizer, as many places have only portable toilets.

  • Dress appropriately: boots for muddy farm trails and layers for typical Seattle drizzles.

  • Mud-proof the trunk for muddy pumpkins and boots. Bring spare shoes for the ride home.

  • Have cash on hand for activities and food.

  • Leave the stroller behind... and the dog. Typically you'll have a bumpy landscape to traverse, and most places are not dog-friendly.

Kirkland Residents Invited to Participate in Citywide Costume Swap

The community had a great time at the Costume swap last October. Photo courtesy of the City of Kirkland.

The community had a great time at the Costume swap last October. Photo courtesy of the City of Kirkland.

Reduce waste by reusing or repurposing Halloween costumes.

By Stephanie Quiroz | Tuesday, September 25, 2018 | Courtesy of KirklandReporter.com

The city of Kirkland is hosting its second annual Halloween Costume Swap. The community is welcome to donate and trade costumes.

“Kirkland’s Halloween Costume Swap is a fantastic way to reduce waste by reusing or repurposing costumes,” Kellie Stickney, Kirkland’s communications program manager, said.

Stickney said this event encourages the community to reduce what they must buy and reuse items instead of buying new. Around 150 costumes were collected last year. Stickney said they anticipate a much larger response this year.

Instead of buying new Halloween costumes, the community is welcome to stop by the Kirkland City Hall (Peter Kirk Room) and donate costumes, masks and accessories from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. this week, through Sept. 28. Infant through adult costumes in good condition are accepted. Individuals are welcome to donate more than one costume and they don’t have to donate in order to swap costumes.

The costume swap will continue from 9-11:30 a.m. Sept. 29.

The North Kirkland Community Center is accepting donations as well.

For more information on the Costume Swap, visit, kirklandwa.gov/recycle.

The children had a great time swapping new costumes. Photo courtesy of the City of Kirkland.

The children had a great time swapping new costumes. Photo courtesy of the City of Kirkland.

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Kirkland’s Dawson Searches for 39 Different Commute Methods

Paddleboarding is one way Bruce Dawson has commuted to work this month. Photo courtesy of Bruce Dawson

Paddleboarding is one way Bruce Dawson has commuted to work this month. Photo courtesy of Bruce Dawson

A Kirkland man is challenging himself to commute using a different method for each day of the month.

By Kailan Manandic | Monday, September 17, 2018 8:30am | Courtesy of KirklandReporter.com

Whether it’s a bike, bus or balloon, Kirkland resident Bruce Dawson is searching for alternative ways to commute to work as part of his 2018 Commute Challenge.

Dawson hasn’t gone as far as to use a balloon to commute, but he’s made his 1.25-mile commute to Google’s Kirkland campus via stilts, water skis, a unicycle, a paddleboard and 23 other methods, all in an effort to make his commute more interesting and less car-centric.

“North Americans spend a lot of time in their cars, always taking their cars to work and driving alone,” Dawson said. “Part of this is also just demonstrating that there are other ways to get to work, and some of them are not practical of course, but I’m taking a carpool to work tomorrow…ultimately it makes you healthier and happier. Every day I do this, I feel so happy when I get into work.”

THE IDEA

Dawson first completed the month-long challenge in April 2017. He often used about six different commute methods to get to work because he lives near his workplace: walking, running, cycling, unicycling, inline skating and taking a bus.

The diversity of his typical commute methods planted an idea in Dawson’s head and he would make jokes to a colleague about using a different method for each day of a month. That was in March 2017.

“I [joked] a couple of times and at one point the co-worker just kind of got annoyed and said, ‘Put up or shut up…You should actually go do it,’” Dawson said.

So Dawson set out to complete the challenge. And he succeeded. He used 20 different methods to get to work for each weekday of the month. Out of them all, Dawson concluded that swimming in 46 degree water was the least practical.

“Zero stars, would not swim again,” Dawson wrote in a blog post. “Swimming was the only commute method that was simultaneously unpleasant, inefficient, and potentially dangerous – it’s the trifecta.”

The 2018 Commute Challenge was moved to September because of the cold weather during his first challenge. Despite this, he maintains that water skiing was the most fun he had commuting to work during last year’s challenge.

“That was just such a great way to start the day,” Dawson said, “Water skiing was amazing.”

Dawson added that he was surprised at how well the challenge went the first time. He had been saving his bike and a bus ride as reserve methods if any of the other ones fell through, but he didn’t need to use it.

ANOTHER CHALLENGE

Dawson quickly decided to do the challenge again after the success of the first challenge and the first thing he changed was the time of year. He began this month with a paddleboard commute and is still going strong more than halfway through the challenge.

“I had some fun experiences with people,” Dawson said. “The first day of this one, I had a total stranger help me carry my paddleboard up the hill to Google. That’s kind of cool that you can still get help from random people these days.”

Dawson also added an extra rule that he couldn’t use methods from the 2017 challenge and he said he’s uncertain if he’ll succeed this time.

“Neighbors, friends and coworkers have been very helpful,” Dawson said. “I keep hoping some random person will reach out to me and say, ‘Hey I’d love to lend you my roller skis or give you a ride on a jet ski sometime this month.’ That hasn’t happened yet, but I’m still open to those options.”

Dawson is reaching out to his community for help and different commute ideas. Specifically, he’s looking for roller skis, roller skates, a giant pogo stick, drift skates or a jet ski ride that locals would be willing to lend him.

Additionally, Dawson is open to any ideas that are a balanced between practical, whimsical, fun and “not-too-deadly.”

COMMUTES CAN BE FUN

Dawson has been documenting his commute challenge in an effort to encourage his fellow community members to consider using alternate commute methods. His progress for the 2018 challenge can be tracked online at tinyurl.com/commutechallenge2018 or twitter.com/hashtag/commutechallenge?src=hash.

Additionally, locals can email him with ideas at commutechallengekirkland@gmail.com.

“Life is too short to spend it stuck in traffic, or looking for parking,” Dawson wrote in a blog post. “While not everybody has the diversity of commute options that I have, I think that there are some people who commute alone in a car because they haven’t fully considered the costs (financial, societal, environmental) or because they haven’t considered the health and joy benefits of trying other options.”

While taking the bus or a carpool to work may take longer than a solo drive, Dawson points out that those methods may be a better use of time.

“If you can read a book or talk to a friend while commuting then that’s progress,” he wrote. “I use my bike and other non-car methods to commute partly because it’s better for the world (fewer greenhouse gases, one less car on the road, one less parking spot used) but mostly because it makes me happier.”

Bruce Dawson has had his bike ready as a backup method if he runs out of commuting ideas this month. Photo courtesy of Bruce Dawson

Bruce Dawson has had his bike ready as a backup method if he runs out of commuting ideas this month. Photo courtesy of Bruce Dawson

Kirkland Reopens the City’s Oldest Fire Station

The Kirkland City Council, Fire Chief and city staff cut the ribbon for the newly renovated Fire Station 25. Samantha Kelly, Kirkland Volunteer Photographer

The Kirkland City Council, Fire Chief and city staff cut the ribbon for the newly renovated Fire Station 25. Samantha Kelly, Kirkland Volunteer Photographer

Kirkland’s Fire Station 25 opened 44 years ago and hadn’t been remodeled until October 2017.

By Kailan Manandic | Friday, September 14, 2018 8:30am | Courtesy of KirklandReporter.com

Kirkland reopened the city’s oldest fire station on Sunday after an 11-month renovation project that improved firefighters’ workplace health and modernized the building.

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Fire Station 25 first opened 44 years ago on 76th Place Northeast and had never been remodeled before the recent renovations began in October 2017. The city retrofitted the station for seismic activity and modernized the station by replacing all mechanical, plumbing and electrical systems.

“We consider fire stations to be critical infrastructure,” said Dave Van Valkenburg, deputy fire chief of the Kirkland Fire Department. “So the fact that it’s been reinforced with earthquake bracing and extra things to help it survive a natural disaster [is] important to us because we all know we want our fire stations to operate when things go bad.”

Station 25 firefighters, who receive an average two calls per day, according to the city, served the Finn Hill neighborhood from Fire Station 24 during the renovations. Kirkland firefighters aim for a four-minute response time and the 1.7-mile relocation did not interfere with target times, according to fire chief Joe Sanford. At worst, the move added about 30 seconds, he said.

Station 25 firefighters are breathing easy in their cleaner living spaces, which was previously a problem as engine exhaust and dirty gear would permeate the station. The firefighters’ living space is now separated from a designated bunker gear storage area and the engine bay exhaust systems.

“Sixty-five percent of firefighters are experiencing some form of cancer these days, we’re more than double the rate of the average citizen, so things like that are important to us because they adds to the longevity to our firefighters,” Valkenburg said. “Bunker gear is potentially dirty and contaminated with carcinogens or blood-born pathogens.”

The city also added some creature comforts such as improved sleeping quarters and improved the flow of the building to minimize the time it takes for firefighters to gear-up and head out.

“The bedrooms all have individual HVAC controls, we all know how that goes, right? One person likes the bedroom hot, one person likes the bedroom cold,” Valkenburg said.

Additionally, Valkenburg said they improved the station’s generator so that it can support the station more reliably in an emergency.

“The Kirkland Fire Department has provided service from Station 25 in the Finn Hill neighborhood for many years. These renovations make our community and our firefighters safer and ensure that we can continue providing services from Station 25 for decades to come,” said council member Penny Sweet, chair of the Public Safety Committee, in a press release.

The project’s construction costs exceeded $3 million, according to the city, and was paid for by a Fire District 41 bond. Fire District 41 was Finn Hill’s former fire district prior to Kirkland’s annexation of the neighborhood.

The overall project costs were under budget, the city said, and the remaining funds will be used to replace Fire Station 24 in a future project. This project will sell the current station 24 property to help fund a new station 24 located in Juanita.

The city is currently in the planning process for the station 24 project.

The station 25 reopening event brought in about 100 locals, according to Valkenburg. Kirkland City Council members attended the event, including Jon Pascal who spoke about the renovations along with Sanford.

Many locals were interested in the new fire station and had the chance to talk about the different new features with the department staff who attended.

“For the most part,” Valkenburg said, “it was really positive feedback on the layout of the station, the improvements, how it was better for the health and safety of the firefighter and how it allowed them to serve the community better.”

The renovations also included a new art piece on the station that was created by local artist Perri Howard of Velocity Made Good, who also attended the event.

“The theme, ‘Hope in the Dark,’ refers to the steadfast presence of our first responders, ready to roll out at a moment’s notice,” Howard said in a press release.

The Kirkland Arts Commission recommended Howard to the city council.

“The crew who work out of station 25 have been outstanding,” Valkenburg said. “During the remodel, they relocated to a smaller facility that didn’t have as many amenities, had a few logistical issues and a few challenges. They took it all in stride, they made the best of the situation and they never let any of those obstacles impact service and coming back to station 25 … they’ve been really appreciative of the support the citizens have given us.”

Kirkland’s Fire Station 25 in the Finn Hill Neighborhood is the city’s oldest fire station and was recently renovated for the first time in 43 years. Samantha Kelly, Kirkland Volunteer Photographer

Kirkland’s Fire Station 25 in the Finn Hill Neighborhood is the city’s oldest fire station and was recently renovated for the first time in 43 years. Samantha Kelly, Kirkland Volunteer Photographer

Kirkland Fire Department Responds to Early Morning Fire in Rose Hill

Crews from Bellevue, Redmond, Bothell, Woodinville and Eastside Fire and Rescue also responded to the fire at Rose Hill Village.

Kirkland firefighters and Puget Sound Energy staff examine the aftermath of a four-hour fire that destroyed the Rose Hill Village. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Kirkland firefighters and Puget Sound Energy staff examine the aftermath of a four-hour fire that destroyed the Rose Hill Village. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Wednesday, September 12, 2018 11:12am | Courtesy of KirklandReporter.com

Kirkland firefighters responded to multiple reports of a fire in the Rose Hill Village at 3 a.m., Sept. 12.

Upon arrival, firefighters reported heavy fire coming from the east side of the building, located in the 12600 block of Northeast 85th Street, and coming from the roof, according to a city of Kirkland press release. The magnitude of the fire caused a request for additional resources to the scene.

Firefighters initially attacked the fire from inside the building, but withdrew to the exterior due to fire in the attic space, the release states.

The fire caused Northeast 85th Street between 126th Avenue Northeast and 132nd Avenue Northeast to be closed Wednesday morning. Two Kirkland firefighters experienced minor injuries and were treated at the scene. The fire was extinguished hours later, at about 7 a.m.

“I want to thank all the units that assisted us this morning including Bellevue, Redmond, Bothell, Woodinville and Eastside Fire and Rescue,” Kirkland Fire Chief Joe Sanford said in the release. “All the firefighters on the scene acted with the utmost professionalism in handling this situation.”

Though the fire has been extinguished, it is anticipated that crews will remain on the scene for most of the day to complete the investigation and continue putting out any hot spots.

Kirkland firefighters and Puget Sound Energy staff examine the aftermath of a four-hour fire that destroyed the Rose Hill Village. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Kirkland firefighters and Puget Sound Energy staff examine the aftermath of a four-hour fire that destroyed the Rose Hill Village. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Kirkland firefighters and Puget Sound Energy staff examine the aftermath of a four-hour fire that destroyed the Rose Hill Village. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Kirkland firefighters and Puget Sound Energy staff examine the aftermath of a four-hour fire that destroyed the Rose Hill Village. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Meet Mrs. FrogLegs

She’s sugar, spice, and all business

By Lisa Patterson | September 7, 2018

Photos by Jeff Hobson

Photos by Jeff Hobson

In 2008, Laura Vida’s kitchen almost always had a light dusting of flour, sugar, and candy sprinkles. It’s the year the stay-at-home mom of three’s cooking classes in her Seattle home evolved into an actual business, and FrogLegs Culinary Academy was hatched.

“(It was) thrilling, scary, exciting … it’s hard to describe how I felt at that time as turning what started as a way for me to work from home and being around my kids was now becoming a full-born business — in my home,” Vida said. “Props to my husband for his patience.”

FrogLegs Culinary Academy is an engaging and hands-on cooking school and special event space for kids and adults. It offers edible education and entertainment with a wide range of cooking classes and seasonal workshops, birthday parties, summer and school break camps, as well as corporate team building, group events, and catering.

Edible cookie dough

Edible cookie dough

In 2016, Vida’s home-based Seattle business hopped over Lake Washington, and she opened FrogLegs in Kirkland. And this summer, it jumped back over to Seattle to open an additional location at University Village, where there are drop-in cake-and cupcake-decorating classes, as well as an expanded schedule of adult cooking classes and team-building events.

“In addition to an expanded selection of food-inspired retail goods and colorful party supplies, the Mrs. FrogLegs Treat Mercantile is a prominent new feature,” Vida said. “We are the first in the area to offer edible cookie dough — no eggs and heat-treated flour make it safe to eat.”

You can get fun flavors of cookie dough goodness at both the Seattle and Kirkland locations. And if you are looking for a sweet gift, they also sell adorable items like giant plush cupcake pillows with smiley faces and a cherry on top, and fresh-baked cookies.

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When Vida finds a moment to reflect about how her stay-at-home hobby morphed into a successful business, it continues to energize her. She was raised in Michigan, where she could be found catching frogs (which inspired the name) and spent time with both sets of grandparents, where she cooked alongside them every chance she got. When she got older, friends would ask her how to cook and bake, and later she would get hired to cater events. She had the talent, but wasn’t sure how that would translate into a business.

“When I first started, it was this idea that hadn’t really been done before, so I found the open road exciting,” she said. “It was a blending of all the things I loved: food, gatherings, children, holidays, and celebrations all rolled into one. It was probably about year three that I really felt this could turn into something bigger!”

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Her retail marketing, branding experience, passion, and professionalism propelled the company, and she has advice for others who have an idea they are considering growing.

“If you have an entrepreneurial spirit inside, I absolutely think you should pay attention to that. However, that being said, many startup businesses are not successful because the emotion takes over, walls are painted, and décor imagined all before the business plan, budgeting, and real practicality of it all is accounted for,” she said. “Starting a business is a risk. Calculate your risk, surround yourself with people who will give you honest opinions, do your research, know your customers and what they want, and see the demand. Take the emotion out of it, capitalize on your strengths, understand and accept your limitations. Acknowledge that you are now HR, accounting, store manager, dishwasher, customer service, and quality control, and embrace it.

“When this is all accounted for, roll up those sleeves, and start referring to yourself as #girlboss!”

FrogLegs Culinary Academy
froglegskca.com

Readers' Choice: Best Restaurants in Seattle

Our annual readers’ poll received a record number of responses this year. See all the winners here

BY: CHELSEA LIN AND DARIA KROUPODEROVA | FROM THE PRINT EDITION | SEPTEMBER 2018

Image Credit: Alex Crook  PHO SURE: Pho Bac Sup Shop’s signature dish is this short rib pho, paired with a glass of natural red wine

Image Credit: Alex Crook

PHO SURE: Pho Bac Sup Shop’s signature dish is this short rib pho, paired with a glass of natural red wine

This article appears in print as the cover story of the September 2018 issue. Read more from the Best of the Best Restaurants feature story hereClick here to subscribe.

Best New Restaurant
Pho Bac Sup Shop 
Chinatown–International District; thephobac.com

Best Neighborhood Restaurant
Ma‘ono Fried Chicken & Whiskey 
West Seattle; maonoseattle.com

Best Pop-up Restaurant
Surrell 
Pop-up; surrellseattle.com

Best Eastside Restaurant
Cafe Juanita 
Kirkland; cafejuanita.com

Best Cheap-eats Place
Mr. Gyros 
Multiple locations; mrgyroseattle.com

Best Gluten-free Dining Options
Cafe Flora 
Madison Park; cafeflora.com

Best Vegetarian Dining Options
Cafe Flora 
Madison Park; cafeflora.com

Best Juice/Smoothie Bar
Pressed Juicery 
Multiple locations; pressedjuicery.com

Best Brunch
Portage Bay Cafe 
Multiple locations; portagebaycafe.com

Best Independent Coffee Shop
Caffe Vita 
Multiple locations; caffevita.com

Best View
Ray’s Boathouse 
Ballard; rays.com

Best Place for Outdoor Dining
Westward 
Lake Union; westwardseattle.com

Best Place to Dine Alone
Oddfellows 
Capitol Hill; oddfellowscafe.com

Best Restaurant for Kids
Tutta Bella 
Multiple locations; tuttabella.com

Best Late-night Dining
13 Coins 
Multiple locations; 13coins.com

Best Diner
Hattie’s Hat 
Ballard; hatties-hat.com

Best Splurge Restaurant
Canlis 
Queen Anne; canlis.com

Best Tasting Menu
The Herbfarm
Woodinville; theherbfarm.com

Best Sandwich
HoneyHole Sandwiches
Capitol Hill; thehoneyhole.com

Best Salads
Evergreens 
Multiple locations; evergreens.com

Best Takeout
Biscuit Bitch 
Multiple locations; biscuitbitch.com

Best Burgers
Dick’s Drive-In 
Multiple locations; ddir.com

Best Barbecue
Jack’s BBQ 
Georgetown; jacksbbq.com

Best Pizza
Serious Pie 
Downtown and South Lake Union; seriouspieseattle.com

Best Oyster Bar
The Walrus and the Carpenter 
Ballard; thewalrusbar.com

Best Seafood
RockCreek Seafood and Spirits
Fremont; rockcreekseattle.com

Best Sushi
Shiro’s Sushi 
Belltown; shiros.com

Best Poke/Hawaiian
45th Stop N Shop & Poke Bar
Wallingford; Facebook, “45th Stop N Shop & Poke Bar”

Best Steak
Metropolitan Grill 
Downtown; themetropolitangrill.com

Best Korean Food
Revel 
South Lake Union; relayrestaurantgroup.com/restaurants/revel

Best Chinese Food
Din Tai Fung 
Multiple locations; dintaifungusa.com

Best Ramen
Kizuki Ramen 
Multiple locations; kizuki.com

Best Pho
Pho Bac 
Multiple locations; thephobac.com

Best Thai Food
Thai Tom 
University District; Facebook, “Thai Tom”

Best Indian Food
Nirmal’s
Pioneer Square; nirmalseattle.com

Best Middle Eastern Food
Mamnoon
Capitol Hill; mamnoonrestaurant.com

Best Vietnamese Food
Ba Bar 
Multiple locations; babarseattle.com

Best French Food
Le Pichet 
Downtown; lepichetseattle.com

Best Italian Food
Spinasse
Capitol Hill; spinasse.com

Best Mexican Food
La Carta de Oaxaca 
Ballard; lacartadeoaxaca.com

Best Food Truck
El Camión 
Multiple locations; elcamionseattle.com

Best Ice Cream/Gelato Shop
Molly Moon’s 
Multiple locations; mollymoon.com

Baked Goods: A twice-baked almond croissant from Bakery Nouveau is an essential Seattle treat. Photo by Alex Crook

Baked Goods: A twice-baked almond croissant from Bakery Nouveau is an essential Seattle treat. Photo by Alex Crook

Best Bakery
Bakery Nouveau 
Multiple locations; bakerynouveau.com

Best Doughnut Shop
Top Pot 
Multiple locations; toppotdoughnuts.com

Best Dessert
Hot Cakes 
Ballard and Capitol Hill; getyourhotcakes.com

Best Cupcakes
Cupcake Royale 
Multiple locations; cupcakeroyale.com

Best Cookies
Hello Robin 
Capitol Hill; hellorobincookies.com

Best Cocktail Bar
Canon 
Capitol Hill; canonseattle.com

Best Happy Hour
Toulouse Petit
Lower Queen Anne; toulousepetit.com

Best Neighborhood Pub
Chuck’s Hop Shop 
Central District and Greenwood; chuckshopshop.com

Best Dive Bar
Linda’s Tavern 
Capitol Hill; lindastavern.com

Best Sports Bar
Rhein Haus 
Capitol Hill; rheinhausseattle.com

Best Local Brewery/Tasting Room
Fremont Brewing Company 
Fremont; fremontbrewing.com

Best Local Winery/Tasting Room
Chateau Ste. Michelle 
Woodinville; ste-michelle.com

Best Local Distillery/Tasting Room
Woodinville Whiskey Co.
Woodinville; woodinvillewhiskeyco.com

Must List: Bumbershoot, Summer Rewind Film Festival, Bremerton Blackberry Festival

Your weekly guide to Seattle's hottest events.

BY: DARIA KROUPODEROVA  |  Posted August 30, 2018  |  Courtesy of SeattleMag.com

Image Credit: David Conger

Image Credit: David Conger

MUST LOVE MUSIC

Bumbershoot
(8/31–9/2) Bumbershoot is supposed to be a festival, but it’s always had a slightly melancholy end-of-summer vibe—and it doesn’t help that it’s named after an umbrella, callously reminding us that eight months of rain are around the corner. Bold-face names in this year’s lineup include Lil Wayne and Fleet Foxes; other offerings include dance, comedy, theater, visual arts and yoga on the lawn. Times and prices vary. Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St.; 206.684.7200; bumbershoot.com

MUST DO THE PUYALLUP

Washington State Fair
(8/31–9/23) Have you ever witnessed daring horseback acrobatics or rode on an old-fashioned roller coaster? No? Then it’s time to hop in your car and get to Puyallup for the Washington State Fair. Ogle prize-winning produce, taste a fair scone or buttery elephant ear, take in a rodeo and listen to Macklemore (9/21) at the state’s biggest fair. Times and prices vary. Closed Tuesdays and September 5. Washington State Fair Events Center, Puyallup, 110 Ninth Ave. SW; 253.845.1771; thefair.com

MUST GAME

PAX West
(8/31–9/3) This weekend, Seattle’s downtown hub will taken over by the crème de la crème of the gaming industry. The annual Penny Arcade Expo (PAX) showcases the best and on the rise video, arcade and tabletop games during this jam packed four-day festival. Check out panels on the latest games, meet gaming legends and test out the newest games for yourself. PAX sells out every year, so if you’re even remotely interested in checking it out, buy a day pass ASAP. Times and prices vary. Washington State Convention Center, downtown, 705 Pike St.; west.paxsite.com

MUST WATCH FILMS

Summer Rewind Film Festival
(8/31–9/6) Soak up the last bits of summer by seeing the season’s blockbuster hits. Cinerama will be showing the best summer movies starting this weekend. Watch (or rewatch) Ocean’s 8Deadpool 2Jurassic World: Fallen KingdomA Quiet Place and more. Just don’t forget the chocolate popcorn. Times vary. $15. Cinerama, downtown, 2100 Fourth Ave.; 206.448.6680; cinerama.com

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MUST EAT BLACKBERRIES

Bremerton Blackberry Festival
(9/1–9/3) Stuff yourself silly with one of Pacific Northwest’s most iconic berries at this family friendly festival. Now in it’s 29th year, the festival celebrates blackberries by preparing them every which way. Want blackberry ice cream? They got that. Or how about blackberry sausage? Yep, they got that too. Wash the treats down with some blackberry wine or soda. Don’t worry, if you feel overloaded on blackberries, they will have vendors selling non-blackberry food and drink, too. Times vary. Free. Bremerton Boardwalk Waterfront, Bremerton, 100 Washington Beach Ave.; blackberryfestival.org

Summerfest Brings Weekend of Music and Art to Kirkland

Diverse lineup of bands, new KidZone entertain festival goers of all ages.

By Katie Metzger  |  Courtesy of KirklandReporter.com

The main stage at Kirkland Summerfest featured many bands, including The Dusty 45s and Creme Tangerine. Photo via Facebook

The main stage at Kirkland Summerfest featured many bands, including The Dusty 45s and Creme Tangerine. Photo via Facebook

KEXP presented Kirkland Summerfest on Aug. 10-12, featuring music, art and entertainment for all ages.

Summerfest is a three day festival, where attendees can discover a diverse lineup of acclaimed local musicians performing on the waterfront main stage, according to its website, kirklandsummerfest.com.

New this year was a KidZone and Create Zone at Heritage Park, featuring train rides, an obstacle course, a rock wall, bouncy houses, Touch-A-Truck, interactive arts, robotics and tasty treats.

Kirkland Summerfest is a benefit for the Kirkland Downtown Association.

Star Wars characters meet local families in the KidZone at Heritage Park during Kirkland Summerfest. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Star Wars characters meet local families in the KidZone at Heritage Park during Kirkland Summerfest. Katie Metzger/staff photo

The 11-acre KidZone entertains children and adults with inflatables, activities and more. Photo via Facebook

The 11-acre KidZone entertains children and adults with inflatables, activities and more. Photo via Facebook

Families learn to draw at Summerfest, Kirkland’s annual music and arts festival. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Families learn to draw at Summerfest, Kirkland’s annual music and arts festival. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Kids get to Touch-a-Truck at Kirkland Summerfest. Photo via Facebook

Kids get to Touch-a-Truck at Kirkland Summerfest. Photo via Facebook

Families play with bubbles in the KidZone at Kirkland Summerfest on Aug. 11. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Families play with bubbles in the KidZone at Kirkland Summerfest on Aug. 11. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Kirkland Summerfest featured a variety of food vendors. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Kirkland Summerfest featured a variety of food vendors. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Hair Nation, the regions’s ultimate 80’s hair rock band, performed at Kirkland Summerfest. Photo via Facebook

Hair Nation, the regions’s ultimate 80’s hair rock band, performed at Kirkland Summerfest. Photo via Facebook

The Top 25 Neighborhoods in Seattle: 2018 Edition

From Greenwood to Beacon Hill, here are the places Seattleites want to live most.

By Seattle Met Staff  Edited by Darren Davis  2/27/2018 at 8:00am  Published in the March 2018 issue of Seattle Met |  Courtesy of SeattleMet.com

SEATTLE IS SO HOT RIGHT NOW. How many times have prospective homebuyers heard this as both a boast and a warning? Yes, home prices continue to rise at unprecedented levels, thanks to a tech boom that keeps booming. But focusing only on this skyrocketing trajectory ignores the wealth of character found across Seattle’s neighborhoods. Using hard real estate data, and factoring in the less quantifiable (but nonetheless crucial) matter of what’s cool, here are the top 25 places to live in the city.

 Glossary

  • Walk Score: A 0–100 metric that reflects a neighborhood’s “walkability,” or its proximity to restaurants, shops, parks, and other amenities.
  • Transit Score: A 0–100 metric that reflects a neighborhood’s accessibility via public transit.
  • YOY: Year-over-year percentages show changes in real estate data from data collected the previous year.

1. Wallingford

Median Sale Price: $890k  •  Sale Price Change YoY: 11.3%  •  Homes Sold in 2017: 251  •  Median Rent: $2,979  •  Walk Score: 83  •  Transit Score: 59

Nestled comfortably between Lake Union and Green Lake, Wallingford is a centrally located neighborhood that could, in another city, be confused with a cozy suburb. Craftsman-style homes with handsome porches line streets dappled with sunlight in the summertime. But walk a few blocks to North 45th Street and suddenly Wallingford takes on a Main Street flair: record stores, local merchants, and unfussy eateries like the affordable sushi spot Musashi’s and of course the original Dick’s Burgers. Further south the surroundings transform into a hot up-and-coming destination for both brunch and happy hour, a stretch that hosts Eltana, the Whale Wins, Thackeray, and Pablo y Pablo, to name only a few. This trek leads to Wallingford’s emerald jewel: Gas Works Park, with its industrial architecture and panoramic view of downtown (and the seaplanes flying into and out of Lake Union), the most distinctive patch of green in the city.

2. Central District

Median Sale Price $770k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 10.8%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 256  •  Median Rent $2,700  •  Walk Score 88  •  Transit Score 67

Close to the perks of metropolitan life (lots of bus lines, Capitol Hill bars) but far enough from big-city chaos (bustling university campus, those same Capitol Hill bars) the Central District is a residential sweet spot. And people have taken notice. Many a starkly modern condo has sprouted up between nineteenth-century Victorian houses and craftsman revival homes. Jewish, Asian, and black communities have historically lived in the Central District, but the area’s becoming more gentrified—yes, the G-word—by the day. Now places like Chuck’s Hop Shop draw beer nerds with IPAs and funky sours, and Union Coffee and Squirrel Chops caffeinate nearby residents, while neon-lit Uncle Ike’s beckons cannabis seekers near and far. (It’s the highest-grossing pot shop in the state.) Some change that’s easy to get behind though: Judkins Park. What once was a deep ravine used as a dump has blossomed into a six-block stretch of green space and playfields. —Rosin Saez 

3. North Admiral

Median Sale Price $716k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 15.7%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 243  •  Median Rent $2,817  •  Walk Score 68  •  Transit Score 42

While residents to the west know the differing characteristics of their community across the bridge, Seattle at large has only lately started recognizing the distinct neighborhoods that make up what they’ve known all along as just West Seattle. North Admiral is one such community—one of the oldest neighborhoods in West Seattle and the place many Seattleites conjure when thinking of the peninsula. East of Alki and just above the heart of West Seattle, North Admiral embraces beachfront mansions on the Duwamish Head and, further inland, blocks of dignified homes flanking California Avenue. Long considered remote, even after the bridge opened, many homebuyers are now fighting each other off to move to West Seattle.

4. Fremont

Median Sale Price $801k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 22.3%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 264  •  Median Rent $2,628  •  Walk Score 84  •  Transit Score 58

For years, North 36th Avenue, the commercial center of Fremont, remained relatively unaffected by new development compared to its neighbors. The stretch is lined with old bike tinkerers, hippie shops, and midcentury houses turned into coffee shops, and Thai restaurants. But the recent upzone changes things, clearing the way for taller mixed-use residential buildings among (and, in many cases, in place of) the mixed-and-matched commercial tableau. Case in point Modern Korean gem Revel, until recently housed in an unassuming old one-story building, will soon find itself in the ground floor of a shiny new condominium. But fret not. The reliably weird Center of the Universe should weather the coming developments and still appear weird on the other end. Plus, its hillside microneighborhoods of incongruous streets and hidden stairways remain atop the list of Seattle’s most unique and sought-after residential zones.

Fremont, the self-proclaimed “Center of the Universe.”  IMAGE:  SHUTTERSTOCK/JOSEPH SOHM

Fremont, the self-proclaimed “Center of the Universe.”

IMAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK/JOSEPH SOHM

5. Capitol Hill

Median Sale Price $600k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 29.0%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 524  •  Median Rent $2,341  •  Walk Score 91  •  Transit Score 73

Every time someone declares Capitol Hill “over”—no longer the wild, creative heart of Seattle, thanks to parking woes, price tags, or the fact that the Block Party just feels so corporate these days, man—two newcomers discover it for the first time. They wander Lake View Cemetery at noon to marvel at the solitude, or wait in line at 1am for a cream cheese hot dog outside Neumos. Fresh faces walk Pike/Pine on a rowdy Friday night and feel like they’ve finally found their people. Lately the best advertisement for downtown housing is that it’s walking distance to Capitol Hill. The mark of a truly vital neighborhood is its ability to be reborn again and again, from auto-sales row to party central, from outsider haven to the city’s most in-demand real estate. Think Capitol Hill is over? That’s okay. For another resident, it’s just begun. —Allison Williams

6. Ballard

Median Sale Price $760k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 15.9%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 870  •  Median Rent $2,296  •  Walk Score 87  •  Transit Score 51

Just off the Lake Washington Ship Canal, the bustling City of Ballard sprouted a century ago from these marinas and fishermen’s terminals. Now its stretch of trendy boutiques and restaurants rivals the shopping and nightlife scenes anywhere else in Seattle. But the busy southern end of this increasingly popular neighborhood is just the front door, so to speak. New condominium developments give way to older apartment dwellings and then, as you go farther north, quiet single-family neighborhoods, peppered here and there with community parks and surprising pockets of bars and restaurants a bit more low key than the weekender favorite Ballard Ave. Travel west and, suddenly, a beach! Bonfires and kite surfers fill Golden Gardens every year as soon as the sun cooperates. It’s no wonder many residents want to again recognize Ballard as its own city.

7. Greenwood

Median Sale Price $635k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 6.4%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 359  •  Median Rent $2,486  •  Walk Score 85  •  Transit Score 52

Long coveted by young families looking for a quiet place to put down roots, Greenwood remains one of Seattle’s residential beating hearts. The neighborhood features traditional homes mixed with newer construction (the status quo across much of Seattle in 2018), laid out in a straightforward grid (not so typical for Seattle) and bisected by a commercial stretch of craft cocktail bars and family-friendly cafes. Greenwood can also claim most of the benefits of both a Seattle suburb and a more urban pocket. Far enough north from the commercial hubbub that surrounds Lake Union, kids can play outside their homes without worrying about cars speeding by on a shortcut to an after-work happy hour meetup. But it’s only around 15 minutes into downtown via Aurora or I-5. Expect a lot of competition in this consistently red-hot neighborhood. 

8. Leschi

Median Sale Price $779k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 6.0%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 132  •  Median Rent $2,943  •  Walk Score 72  •  Transit Score 53

Topographically speaking, Leschi is a neighborhood divided. Most of its identity centers on the Lake Washington shoreline, where cyclists pedal past pleasure boats bobbing in the harbor and a handful of restaurants (Meet the Moon, Daniel’s Broiler) cater to families and mature tech types. Down the street, tiny Leschi Market somehow has just the thing for both weeknight diners and sunbathers who surreptitiously drink rosé on the nearby T-dock in the summer. That pastoral vibe extends up the steep hillside. Houses might be tudors or ramblers, older or brand spanking new, but they all embrace those panoramic views. Atop the ridge, residents tend to identify with other, adjacent neighborhoods: Madrona with its quaint village strip or the Central District where residency doesn’t imply that you live in a lakefront mansion. But even these sedate blocks have the occasional flash of sparkling lake water. —Allecia Vermillion

Leschi’s Lake Washington marina, with eyes on Bellevue.  IMAGE:  GEORGE COLE

Leschi’s Lake Washington marina, with eyes on Bellevue.

IMAGE: GEORGE COLE

9. Montlake

Median Sale Price $1.2 million  •  Sale Price Change YoY 25.8%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 79  •  Median Rent $3,709  •  Walk Score 67  •  Transit Score 62

 

Less conspicuously wealthy than Madison Park, nearby Montlake still boasts idyllic communities of wide streets and old craftsman and tudor homes that will put you back some real cash. There’s something vaguely New England about many Montlake properties, with their pillars and porches and manicured lawns just asking for a game of croquet or a weekend afternoon of fetch with a well-trained pup. This sense of timelessness extends into Montlake’s own downtown district, nary a boxy condo in sight. Instead, the slip of a commercial zone contains the cozy neighborhood tableau of an upscale restaurant (Cafe Lago), a coffee shop (Fuel Coffee), a florist, a bike shop, and a handful of other local merchants. Bookended by two expansive parks, Interlaken and the Arboretum, Montlake is a posh community on the water surrounded by greenery. 

10. Bitter Lake

Median Sale Price $400k  •  Sale Price Change YoY –9.1%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 168  •  Median Rent $2,235  •  Walk Score 68  •  Transit Score 48

This sliver of a neighborhood (drive about a dozen blocks on Aurora Avenue and you’ll pass right by it) packs a lot of character into such small square mileage. Named for the body of water on its north end, Bitter Lake is a long-overlooked but up-and-coming area owing to its range of housing options—from new multifamily developments to old single-story homes to proud lakefront properties. The neighborhood’s density—high compared to other mixed-zone communities of apartments, condos, and single-family homes—means you won’t find the wide streets and long sidewalks that prospective homebuyers may require as the connective tissue between their home and the community. Instead, Bitter Lake reflects its location: a commuter-friendly residential pocket immediately adjacent to Highway 99 with enough space to settle in and put down roots.

11. Mount Baker

Median Sale Price $821k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 46.6%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 139  •  Median Rent $3,047  •  Walk Score 75  •  Transit Score 59

The craftsman homes are so tall and stately, you’d swear you were on the north end of Capitol Hill. But the people who occupy them are younger and less white than you’d expect. Mount Baker doesn’t have a ton of shops and restaurants, though the existing neighborhood fixtures are fiercely beloved, from Mioposto’s wood-fired breakfast pizzas to the impeccable microroasts at QED Coffee. Thanks to the Saloon, a recent arrival to the area, there’s even a place to get a good manhattan, sans children. Throw in some sprawling Olmsted-designed greenways, a beach, a legit playground, a light rail station, and easy access to downtown and the Eastside: Mount Baker may not have Capitol Hill’s rocking nightlife, but nobody hanging out at the Community Club (a hub of musical performances, yoga classes, even potlucks) seems to be complaining. —AV 

12. Beacon Hill

Median Sale Price $574k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 17.5%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 453  •  Median Rent $2,461  •  Walk Score 61*  •  Transit Score 65*

Walk around this southeast Seattle neighborhood and you might notice the wall murals, statues, and other public art celebrating a range of ethnic communities. Beacon Hill’s diverse residents, largely Asian or Pacific Islander and foreign born, have shaped the neighborhood into what it is now. Though much of the community contains single-family homes, it’s surrounded by cultural hubs exclusive to Beacon Hill. You can find social justice nonprofit El Centro de la Raza with its front-yard garden and playground, conveniently located by the light rail station and go-to cafe the Station. In North Beacon Hill, find ethnic food essentials at the Red Apple grocery store or spend a few sweaty hours climbing at the Seattle Bouldering Project. And there’s always Jefferson Park for a picnic date. —Hayat Norimine 

13. Fauntleroy

Median Sale Price $735k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 34.9%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 118  •  Median Rent $2,724  •  Walk Score 47  •  Transit Score 45

Out of all the neighborhoods in Seattle proper, even the peripheral residential communities to the north and south, like Bitter Lake and Rainier Beach, Fauntleroy is perhaps the most hidden from the heart of Seattle. Across the West Seattle Bridge, through the heart of West Seattle and downward into Fauntleroy Cove, this small pocket of cottages and bungalows blesses residents with a level of marine serenity that shouldn’t be possible just six miles from downtown Seattle. The sound laps gently upon the isolated cove, a strip of sand lined in parts with the neighborhood’s most covetable homes, offering peaceful (if chilly) walks in the gray months and knockout views of the Olympic Mountains on clear days. And if residents need to get away even further from the city for a weekend day trip, the Fauntleroy ferry dispatches daily escapes to nearby Vashon island and Southworth.

The secluded Lincoln Park in Fauntleroy, a picturesque stroll year round.  IMAGE:  GOERGE COLE

The secluded Lincoln Park in Fauntleroy, a picturesque stroll year round.

IMAGE: GOERGE COLE

14. South Lake Union

Median Sale Price $490k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 14.6%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 13  •  Median Rent $2,438  •  Walk Score 92  •  Transit Score 86

 

No other neighborhood better illustrates Seattle’s tech-driven boom than South Lake Union. Look at an aerial photo from just 10 years ago and note the skyline now (if you can see past all the cranes). What was once a low-key lakefront district filled mostly with warehouses transformed seemingly overnight into the epicenter of the city’s tech industry, now under the shadow of the Amazon headquarters. The blocks between Lake Union and Denny brim during the day with throngs of this new workforce, all heading to or from bites at any of the neighborhood’s wealth of fast-casual concepts or a quick refresh at barre or spin class. Then streets all but empty out at night, when the residents of SLU’s midsize to large condo developments either revel in the quiet or take advantage of the central location, making a quick trip downtown or to Capitol Hill.

15. Magnolia

Median Sale Price $868k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 19.7%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 489  •  Median Rent $3,056  •  Walk Score N/A  •  Transit Score N/A

Jutting west, out into the water on a branch of land—gloriously common in Seattle’s quirky geography—Magnolia is like the city’s forested backyard. Lush thickets of trees extend up the hillside from the water like green waves crashing against the shores. The woodland hides towers of multiunit residences and hamlets of sumptuous homes overlooking the water. To the south, Magnolia Park and its tree-lined bluffs boast panoramic views to the west and southwest. But it pales in size next to Discovery Park—the largest park in Seattle, almost a neighborhood unto itself. This expansive swath of public land somehow contains stretches of beach, a historic fort and forest trails, and wide lawns to lay down a picnic or toss a football. Magnolia is not the easiest to get to, it requires a skirt around Interbay and Queen Anne. But isolation is part of its charm.

16. Madison Park

Median Sale Price $1.8 million  •  Sale Price Change YoY 51.7%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 105  •  Median Rent $3,753  •  Walk Score 68  •  Transit Score 35

If there was ever a proper beachfront community in oceanless Seattle—complete with waterfront mansions and swaths of beautiful public land on which locals come to sun and swim and dream of owning something there one day—it’s Madison Park. The upscale community, facing Lake Washington and bordered to the west by the Washington Park Arboretum, feels like its own destination outside of Seattle. The homes in Madison Park are some of the most expensive in Seattle, and understandably so. Modern mansions and breathtaking tudors with long, gated driveways and expansive east-facing windows are as ostentatiously luxurious as Seattle gets. Nearby Madison Park Beach—a wide slope of grass that gets full afternoon sun in summer and leads directly to the shores of Lake Washington—is a local treasure whether you live in the neighborhood or are just visiting.

17. Lower Queen Anne

Median Sale Price $560k  •  Sale Price Change YoY –13.7%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 211  •  Median Rent $2,387  •  Walk Score 92  •  Transit Score 69

One of Seattle’s most dynamic neighborhoods is also one of the most overlooked. Lower Queen Anne’s proximity to KeyArena, Seattle Center, and McCaw Hall makes it a marquee destination for the arts, but it’s rarely thought of as a thriving residential community. Folded in among the busy thoroughfares of Roy and Mercer Streets, however, you’ll find blocks of classic multiunit residences, upscale condos, and even a fair amount of water views. It’s more accurate to think of Lower Queen Anne as a convergence of its neighbors: the self-sustaining community of Upper Queen Anne, and the cosmopolitan buzz of Belltown. And with Lower Queen Anne’s new upzone in place, allowing the construction of taller mixed-use buildings, the neighborhood will soon be flush with new residences, making it an even more viable option for urban dwellers than it’s been all along. 

18. Northgate

Median Sale Price $588k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 21.3%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 568  •  Median Rent $1,861  •  Walk Score N/A  •  Transit Score N/A

It wouldn’t be far fetched to guess the majority of Seattleites venture into Northgate primarily to visit the namesake mall. But thanks to a steep uptick in new development, this expansive community north on Interstate 5 contains dwelling options for both first-time homebuyers looking to get into the market with a condominium and new families vying for a place to spread out a bit. Expect Northgate to continue increasing in density, especially in the mixed-use midrise variety, as the forthcoming Northgate Light Rail Station (scheduled for 2021) makes the outlying neighborhood a more viable commuter option. Seattle’s willingness to invest in this transit infrastructure points to a future in which Northgate, known mostly as home to the largest enclosed mall in the city, gets folded into Seattle as one of its up-and-coming neighborhoods. 

19. Upper Queen Anne

Median Sale Price $845k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 16.1%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 600  •  Median Rent $3,048  •  Walk Score 70  •  Transit Score 59

 

Upper Queen Anne (or just Queen Anne, depending on whom you ask) is an instantly identifiable Seattle neighborhood: the big houses on the hill. Rising above the buzz of Lower Queen Anne to the south, and the lovable hippie community Fremont on the north side, the hill’s summit is among only a handful of places you’ll find platonic front lawns and proper backyards—a real white picket fence vibe—in the whole city. Its elevation, and the stateliness of the homes, gives Upper Queen Anne a bit of an esteemed air. But past the iconic Kerry Park view and the historic Victoria Townhomes, Queen Anne is actually quite a quaint and low-key neighborhood, the sort of supportive community that will keep a local grocer like Ken’s Market thriving even with a Trader Joe’s just down the way.

20. Columbia City

Median Sale Price $680k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 15.3%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 141  •  Median Rent $2,451  •  Walk Score 84  •  Transit Score 59

Gone are the days when Columbia City was a cherished secret: an oasis hidden in Rainier Valley, filled with sloping hills of traditional houses and handsome townhomes, and a most picturesque downtown tract. It boasts neighborhood staples of classic theater (Columbia City Theater), family breakfast favorite (Geraldine’s Counter), pub with live music (the Royal Room), and workaday local merchants trading pleasantries with familiar faces at the summer farmers market. Well, secret’s out. Even with the increase in new home construction and commuteworthy restaurants popping up along Rainier Avenue, Columbia City manages to hang on to its small-town vibes. This might be due to the distance from the city’s downtown core, but mostly it’s thanks to the loyal community who helped build and sustain the character of this distinct Seattle neighborhood, and who want every new resident to fall in love too.

The Olympic Sculpture Park, near Belltown’s many midrise residences.  IMAGE:  SHUTTERSTOCK BY KEROCHAN

The Olympic Sculpture Park, near Belltown’s many midrise residences.

IMAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK BY KEROCHAN

21. Belltown

Median Sale Price $677k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 20.9%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 389  •  Median Rent $2,213  •  Walk Score 97  •  Transit Score 98

Want to be in the thick of it? Belltown is a stark contrast from quiet residential neighborhoods with darling streets and ample parking. The Seattle urban center’s de facto entertainment district, Belltown forgoes playgrounds, family diners, and community theaters for urban dog parks, gastropubs, and nightclubs. A normal Friday might include happy hour frites and a pilsner at Belltown Brewing, then on to chic dinner staples like Tavolàta, ending with a nightcap at any of the reliable dives on Second Avenue. A plethora of old and new condo developments means there is no Lyft fee between last call and home—some with enviable views of Elliott Bay. But Belltown is not all nightlife. Its close proximity to both downtown and the Sound can make for a healthy routine of leisurely strolls to Pike Place Market or weekend jogs along the Olympic Sculpture Park. 

22. Ravenna

Median Sale Price $829k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 3.8%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 211  •  Median Rent $2,899  •  Walk Score 77  •  Transit Score 53

Ravenna made headlines in recent years as one of the hottest housing markets in the entire country. And understandably so. Tracts of gorgeous multistory homes and older mansions line wide streets dappled in green, and it’s quieter than you’d expect from a community so close to the University District and those rowdy youths. Central in the neighborhood, 65th Avenue provides the commercial anchor of grocers, bookstores, and a few bars pleasantly long in the tooth. Also historic is the nearly century-old Roosevelt High School, stately home of the Rough Riders. On the southern end of the neighborhood, the conjoined Ravenna and Cowen Parks provide a lush greenbelt with plenty of winding trails for a bit of respite. That’s why Seattleites move to Ravenna after all, for a little close-by peace and quiet.

23. South Park

Median Sale Price $393k  •  Sale Price Change YoY –3.1%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 55  •  Median Rent $2,114  •  Walk Score 59  •  Transit Score 37

As would-be homebuyers push farther outward from central Seattle to find affordable dwellings, many eyes (and no small amount of developer prospecting) now turn to what has long been considered the city’s most diverse neighborhood. South Park’s majority Hispanic population adds to a food and culture scene unlike anywhere else in Seattle. Out of the historically industrial region, fueled by the Duwamish River, springs a vibrant community filled with public art, traditional eateries, and festivals celebrating both Hispanic and Native American heritage. While an influx of new residents and construction drives the local cost of living up, South Park’s property values have not skyrocketed at unprecedented rates like elsewhere in the city, and local advocacy groups continue to do the work of ensuring the Seattle boom can coexist with the longtime residents of this diverse neighborhood.

24. Hillman City

Median Sale Price $613k  •  Median Sale Price YoY 25.0%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 83  •  Median Rent $2,346  •  Walk Score 84  •  Transit Score 54

Don’t get it confused with Columbia City. This southern stretch of Rainier Avenue may have once been considered outskirts to its desirable neighbor to the north, but Hillman City has taken on an exciting new identity following a period of relative stagnation amid a city experiencing unprecedented growth. But you could even think of Hillman City as Columbia City’s younger sibling. For one, it hosts some of the hippest new casual eats south of the stadiums, like Sam Choy’s Poke to the Max, Big Chickie, Full Tilt Ice Cream’s sister bar Hummingbird Saloon, and microroaster Tin Umbrella. The Hillman City Collaboratory—a coworking space and community incubator brought to the neighborhood’s historic district by two local arts organizations—points to an exciting future of Hillman City as a viable alternative dwelling for creative and civic-minded residents looking to venture out of the Capitol Hill bubble.

25. Georgetown

Median Sale Price $588k  •  Sale Price Change YoY 4.0%  •  Homes Sold in 2017 67  •  Median Rent $2,374  •  Walk Score 69  •  Transit Score 46

So much of Georgetown’s appeal comes from its apparent sovereignty: a neighborhood geographically disconnected from the rest of the city by industrial zones, with a brick-and-mortar, vaguely Southwest aesthetic all its own. This character keeps Georgetown a thriving commercial and residential district, even when it lacks abundant single-family home offerings compared to its neighbors. Just visit to understand its peculiar magic. Drive south—past the stadiums, past SoDo, through the Industrial District—and come upon something of a Route 66 town, brimming with vintage shops, music stores, and first-rate comic book retailer Fantagraphics Books. Biker bar–esque Smarty Pants and divey pool halls rub shoulders with a relatively newer crop of marquee eateries like Fonda La Catrina, Ciudad, and Brass Tacks. Also there’s a giant cowboy boot in a park and a trailer park mall full of vintage clothes and trinkets.

A typical Georgetown street fair.  IMAGE:  PAUL CHRISTIAN GORDON

A typical Georgetown street fair.

IMAGE: PAUL CHRISTIAN GORDON

Data provided by Redfin and Zillow. Median sale prices were collected October–December 2017. Data reflects all residential types, including single-family homes, condos, and townhouses. Year-over-year percentages show changes in real estate data from data collected the previous year.

DOH Provides Steps to Keep Safe from Wildfire Smoke

Air quality degraded by wildfires across the state.

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Tuesday, August 14, 2018 8:30am  |  Courtesy of KirklandReporter.com

Washington State Department of Health is encouraging people in areas affected by wildfire smoke to take necessary steps to protect themselves from poor air quality.

People can take the following steps to protect themselves from smoke due to wildfires:

  • Visit the Washington Smoke Blog or contact local regional clean air agency.
  • Stay indoors, avoid strenuous physical activities outside, and keep indoor air clean. Close windows and doors. Use fans or an air conditioner (AC) when it is hot, and set your AC to recirculate. If you do not have AC and it is too hot to stay home, go to a place with AC such as a mall or library. Remember to stay hydrated. Do not smoke, use candles, or vacuum. Use an air cleaner with a HEPA filter.
  • Contact a health care provider if there are specific health concerns, and dial 911 for emergency assistance if symptoms are serious.

Smoke from wildfires especially increases health risks for babies, children, people over 65, pregnant women, and those with health conditions, such as heart and lung diseases or diabetes.

Breathing smoky air can cause a wide range of symptoms from watery eyes and coughing to chest pain and asthma attacks. People with heart or lung diseases such as asthma are more likely to experience serious and life-threatening symptoms.

Kirkland Police Invite Community to National Night Out

Kirkland police host National Night Out August 7

Wednesday, August 1, 2018 8:30am  |  Courtesy of KirklandReporter.com

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Kirkland Police Department invites Kirkland residents and businesses to a “Neighborhood Block Party” on Tuesday, August 7 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. at the Kirkland Justice Center, 11750 NE 118th St., Kirkland.

Enjoy a barbecue and fun family activities, and learn about neighborhood safety as Kirkland Police join organizations around the country celebrating the 35th Anniversary of National Night Out.

6 Spots to Catch Cheap Movies

Seeking A/C? These theaters offer movie deals that won’t leave you forking over $30 for a ticket and half-empty box of Milk Duds.

By Christina Ausley  7/17/2018 at 9:00am | Courtesy of SeattleMet.com

Seattle’s oldest running independent theater.   IMAGE:  STEFAN MILNE

Seattle’s oldest running independent theater. 

IMAGE: STEFAN MILNE

Central Cinema

$2 movie nights? You heard that right. Catch films like Road House or Point Break on various Tuesday evenings this July through September, as Central Cinema brings us back to the 1970s with affordable films and plenty of pocket cash left over for more than one popcorn refill.

Ark Lodge Cinemas

In convivial Columbia City rests a film emporium with classic red velvet curtains and popcorn-yellow lightbulbs. Children and adults can enjoy a discounted matinee for $9, leaving a few extra dollars for the necessary Junior Mints and Raisinets to pair.

Big Picture

As the first theatre in the State of Washington to booze-up the movie experience with a full bar, Big Picture has upped the movie-going game with seat-side cocktail delivery. Even better, all Monday shows are $8.50.

AMC Stubs

It’s $5 ticket Tuesday. Though it’s a membership-exclusive offer, the free sign-up requires nothing more than an email. Better yet, Cameo Combo Tuesdays offer a movie ticket, popcorn, and Coca-Cola for $10.

Crest Cinema

Dive into the world of comedy, mystery, or adventure for $4. More of a bargain rather than a discount, because it’s offered all of the time. Showcasing a variety of genres and previously featured films like SIFF’s American Animals and the comedic Show Dogs, the theater’s sure to appease families and friends hoping to catch a film’s second go-around.

Grand Illusion Cinema

The city’s oldest theater might have staying power because of its ticket prices—or maybe because it’s a non-profit volunteer-run cinematic escape. Either way, purchase a general admission ticket for $9, or put down $30 for a year’s membership and catch flicks for $5 each.