Seattle Neighborhoods By The Numbers: Where to Rent in 2016

A look at some key figures across 7 of Seattle’s most popular areas for renters.

RENT IN SEATTLE is rising, but that rise isn’t uniform across all neighborhoods. For instance, a low vacancy rate in a neighborhood coupled with paltry inventory means you’re in for a fight to find the ideal apartment. Conversely, renters searching in neighborhoods flush with new construction might experience less competition but pay more overall. So know the numbers, your personal budget, and your capacity for patience when deciding where to look.

Ballard

  • Average Rent for a One-Bedroom $1,656
  • Rent Increase Since 2012 +29%
  • Approximate Number of One-Bedroom Units 1,700
  • Vacancy 14.1%

Beacon Hill

  • Average Rent for a One-Bedroom $1,144
  • Rent Increase Since 2012 +28%
  • Approximate Number of One-Bedroom Units 250
  • Vacancy 4%

Belltown/Downtown/South Lake Union

  • Average Rent for a One-Bedroom  $1,948
  • Rent Increase Since 2012  +14%
  • Approximate Number of One-Bedroom Units 5,800
  • Vacancy 8.9% 

Capitol Hill  

  • Average Rent for a One-Bedroom $1,552
  • Rent Increase Since 2012 +24%
  • Approximate Number of One-Bedroom Units 4,000
  • Vacancy 5.6%

Central District 

  • Average Rent for a One-Bedroom $1,507
  • Rent Increase Since 2012 +24%
  • Approximate Number of One-Bedroom Units 940
  • Vacancy 6%

Fremont/Greenlake/Wallingford 

  • Average Rent for a One-Bedroom $1,530
  • Rent Increase Since 2012 +18%
  • Approximate Number of One-Bedroom Units 1,800
  • Vacancy 1.8% 

West Seattle 

  • Average Rent for a One-Bedroom $1,369
  • Rent Increase Since 2012 +20%
  • Approximate Number of One-Bedroom Units 2,000
  • Vacancy 7.6% 
This article appeared in the May 2016 issue of Seattle Met.